WRONG_WOEID WRONG_WOEID

Children Just As Important As Whales

Children Just As Important..There are some people from European and other developed countries who want to tag those who carry out or support whaling as uncivilized.

Some will go so far as to suggest that the developing countries that support the Japanese stance on whaling are prostituting themselves.

I certainly support the conservation of whales (and many other animals and plants) and endorse the efforts of most groups and individuals who are involved in this task. But I am equally disappointed by their silence pertaining to the injustice being perpetrated by the European fishing industry on a number of African and Pacific countries.

What is upsetting is that some of these same Europeans who will publicize the injustice of killing whales seem oblivious to the death of thousands of Africans caused by Europeans overfishing in African waters. While they clamour for laws to end whaling, they are silent about the European Union (EU) laws that allow European fishermen to deplete African waters of their fish stock.


The problem started as Europe realised that after centuries of indiscriminate fishing in its own waters, it not only needed to enact laws to protect its fish stock, but it needed to go somewhere else to get fish. As a result, laws were penned and rigourously enforced to ensure that fishing in European waters is sustainable.

These laws strictly define the fishing methods, the gears, the areas and durations of fishing time. All this is done in an effort to limit the amount, the sizes and species of fish that can be harvested. For example, in the cod fisheries in the Baltic Sea, special devices have to be used to limit bycatch to a minimum. (Bycatch refers to the unwanted species, types or sizes of fish that are caught incidentally with the wanted fish; these are routinely discarded.)


Now where does Africa fit into this whole equation? Europe currently has fishing accords with 15 developing countries, the majority of these
African. These include Cape Verde, the Comoros, Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Madagascar, Mauritania, Micronesia, Morocco, Mozambique, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles and the Solomon Islands.

Collectively, these countries are paid about 150 million euros yearly by the European Union. (The countries individually are paid different sums
according to the importance of their fisheries to Europe.) Europe, on the other hand, makes about 800 million euros yearly from African and Pacific fish. This is a figure that some experts believe is a significant underestimation.

However, the problem does not lie merely in the relatively large profit Europe makes. Rather, it is the social, economic, environmental, and
health impact it has on the African countries. Even more disturbing is that very little noise is being made and practically nothing is being done to address or rather redress the problem.

About 700 European vessels ply their trade in African waters. They seek a variety of species including shrimp, tuna, squid, and octopus. These boats, however, mainly employ methods that are associated with high levels of bycatch; methods that are severely restricted in Europe. These include bottom trawling, longlining and purse seines. As a result, there is a high level of bycatch in African waters.

High bycatch levels are especially dangerous because of their severe negative impact on the ecosystem and by extension their severe negative impact on the livelihood and life of the people dependent on the viability of these ecosystems. Remember that bycatch is routinely discarded.


Specifically, in Africa millions of tons of seabirds, turtles, sharks, juvenile fishes and even whales are killed every year directly as bycatch or through their dependence on bycatch. This bycatch often includes species of significant economic importance to the native African fishermen who have seen their local fish stock severely depleted. They now have to go much further from land to obtain fish.

Because of the small size of their boats, many of these brave fishermen perish at sea while travelling these longer distances. This results in disaster on land, where at times whole villages have to endure starvation. Children die, and there is a total disruption of the way of life for those left behind. Food security in these countries is seriously threatened; as food dwindles it becomes more expensive and fewer people can afford to buy their basic requirements.

Why does this situation continue? Where does the responsibility lie? Some might even ask why the African countries allow this.

The sad truth is the EU does not sign agreements to limit bycatch levels in many African fisheries. And even in cases where it does, there is hardly any enforcement of these laws on the part of the EU. There are stiff penalties for vessels who violate these laws in European waters, but the EU practically ignores the same breeches in Africa.

Even the basic agreement that allows Europe to exploit only "surplus" African and Pacific marine resources is ignored by the EU, and European vessels routinely underestimate their catch. As a result, 70 percent of the fisheries stretching between Morocco and Congo are facing decline.

Will the EU willingly end this? Was the triangular slave trade willingly ended?


More than 60 percent of the fish on European plates is imported, and the fishery accord with Africa and the Pacific maintains 40,000 jobs in Europe. The main beneficiary is Spain (80 percent) followed by Portugal and France. They know Africa needs the foreign exchange.

What importance does this have for us in Antigua & Barbuda and the rest of the Caribbean?

Firstly, we are our brothers' keeper. If we are asked to save whales and dolphins, why not our brothers and sisters and their children in Africa and the Pacific?

Secondly, these countries are part of the ACP (African, Caribbean and Pacific countries that established a treaty with Europe under the Lome Convention), like we are. Are our governments still so sure that the economic partnership agreement with the EU is such a great idea?

How long will marine conservationists continue to pretend that this situation does not exist? When we vote in agreement with Japan, they ask tourists to boycott our countries. Can we afford to abandon trade with Europe?

Finally, for those who paint murals with whales, dolphins, and other sea creatures, please paint some faces of the poor African children who die because of the EU fishing policies. They look very much like the children you see here in Antigua; the same ones that were helping you to paint the wall.

Dr Jerry Simon (NSA Medical Surgical Rehab Centre, 462 0631, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

 

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47 Comments In This Article   

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Lets not forget China either !!

#47 Nemo » 2011-07-17 16:15

http://weblog.greenpeace.org/oceandefenders/archive/2006/03/happiness_the_chinese_zom.html
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Nemo

@ IWC

#46 Proud Wadadlian » 2010-12-22 12:56

It is clear you mis understood the writers article. It was not pro whaling versus anti whaling. However your disrespect proved his point. You want to go to the Nth level to defend whales but to hell with people.
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Proud Wadadlian

#45 IWC » 2010-12-14 20:22

We are currently researching the migration and feeding habits of Antiguans (since their girth and weight is comparable to whales).

We have set a quota of 300 Bureaucrat Antiguans, 200 Beach Boy Antiguans and 700 Unable to Determine Their Purpose Antiguans.

We will be entering your territorial waters, and culling up to the quantity of our quota, and since Antiguans gratefully accept our contributions of the IWC, we assume they will have no problem with our scientific research in their territorial waters.
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IWC

#44 no one » 2010-11-23 19:23

Even worse is the American and Europeans who engage in "Caribbean Watching" where they get feral humans to mimic civilized behavior by feeding them paper currency! This disgusting behavior has spread the first-world plagues such as SUVs, gold chains and rap "music".

Antigua will clearly be better off without all that disgusting money Americans and Europeans used to force on them
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no one

Surprised

#43 TRUE » 2010-11-22 14:03

I was surprised to learn the damage that whale watching does in several parts of the world. In South Australian communities whale watchers improperly disposed of garbage, disrupt communities, pollute both land and marine environment.
Sadly the whale watchers while they claim to respect nature, did not seem to care much about the native communities and the people who live their.
Even worst their boats caused damage to coral reefs, disturbed marine birds and even killed whales.

I am sure whale watching is not as bad as whale harvesting but it sure seems to be causing considerable damage in some areas.
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TRUE

@ Earth Warrior

#42 Dr. Simon » 2010-11-21 23:12

Your use of the term "surplus African babies" shows the kind of attitude why I would write an article like this one.
No problem in saving African elephants so tourists can go on their Safari and say how cute they look. No problem in saving whales and dolphins so a few privileged ones can go and watch them and so how lovely they are.
"But so what if several thousands of African children die, they are in surplus anyway"
As the son of a fisherman I was taught to respect sea mammals, and my father on more than one occasion gave up his fish catch to save or free dolphins.
While I do not support whaling, I will not put the importance of whales over "surplus African babies".
If you are going to talk about international politics you should know that agents for the anti-whaling lobby give bribes as well.
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Dr. Simon

#41 Earth Warrior » 2010-11-21 18:19

So Dr. Simon: Do you have anything to say about the Antiguan vote in the most recent IWC convention being bought with a hotel suite, some "companionship" and cash?

Serious questions are being asked. Unfortunately, a US$ 7 billion fraud trial will soon overwhelm any publicity nearly extinct whales could attract (let alone surplus African babies) I guess we'll have to pick up this discussion after the Stanford trial, if there is still an "Antigua" after that's done.
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Earth Warrior

#40 Earth Warrior » 2010-11-20 18:12

Dr. Simon,

Obviously, we are all concerned whenever children suffer, African, Asian, European, American, all of them. That should go without saying. I assume that of you, and I hope the sentiment is mutual.

However, Antigua has sided with Japan at the most recent IWC conference. There is convincing evidence that the Antiguan vote was purchased not only with the Japanese support for fisheries complexes for the nation of Antigua, but also with alleged bribes paid directly to the Antiguan representative to the IWC. These charges have not been addressed by the Antiguan government or the individual concerned.
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Earth Warrior

@ wow

#39 Cuban trained doctor » 2010-11-20 16:55

Sorry, but due to the US embargo there was no Kool ( or Cool ) Aid available in Cuba. I don't know if they serve that crap to American trained doctors.
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Cuban trained doctor

In agreement

#38 JP Respect » 2010-11-17 23:08

I very much agree with Dr. Simon's article. Europe pays much higher prices for fair trade products. For example bananas that are produced under conditions where workers are treated fairly and work for fair wages etc.
Why then are they not doing anything about this situation even though it may be contributing to the death of many African children.
And why are environmental groups so quiet on the issue.
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JP Respect

@ Earth Warrior

#37 Dr. Simon » 2010-11-15 22:03

Firstly thanks for taking the time to send a post.
There is a reason that I did not mention Greenpeace or Sea Shepherd, because I have no problems with their activities to save whales. And I certainly did not want to make it Greenpeace or Sea S. versus Whaling interest.
However I primarily wanted to bring attention to specifically European interest who pit themselves against others as bastion of justice. When it suits them they quite rightly trash the Yanks for its injustice against third world countries.
But in this issue of them carrying out an injustice against Africa via Fishing most European environmental groups and Govs. are very quiet or silent.
Since you seem knowledgeable I am sure you know of efforts by Europeans groups in the whole anti -whaling question.
Just wanted to see some efforts being spent on fighting EU exploitation of African Marine Resources and the real human effects it is having.
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Dr. Simon

#36 Ras C » 2010-11-15 19:29

Every one crying out for peace ( even Greenpeace),
Good to see some one crying out for Justice.
Doc. continue with the power of JAH.
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Ras C

@ Wow

#35 Wham » 2010-11-15 19:11

Maybe we did not read the same article, but Senegal was not one of the countries Dr, Simon mentioned.
It is clear you know very little of the topic making a baseless judgment of what the doc used for research.
Then again you admitted your ignorance.
However it clear that you are intimidated by people who don't necessarily follow the status quo and do have a social conscience.
If the doctors who study in Cuba show concerns for issues like these, maybe these are the ones we need in Antigua.
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Wham

#34 EarthWarrior » 2010-11-15 16:53

I'm surprised that no one in Antigua has taken Dr. Simon to task for using the visage of starving African children as an emotional "human shield" for his shameless defense of Japan's illegal whaling in the Antarctic.

Sea Shepherd (the organization Dr. Simon accuses, without the courage to name it) was founded by a Canadian, is based in the United States, operates primarily from the harbours of Australia with ships flagged by Holland.

I'm sure Dr. Simon doesn't think he can convince you that all of the people of all of those countries on all of those continents are collaborating with Sea Shepherd to exterminate little, cute, extraordinarily photogenic African babies.

However, he is counting on you not noticing that he just succeeded in doing just that.
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EarthWarrior

#33 Pellucid » 2010-11-15 15:47

Also disturbing is the complete lack of response of Antiguan to the plight of the Stanford investors and their wives, husbands, sons, daughters, fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, employees, partners, friends, partners.

Hundreds of thousands (certainly a multiple of the population of Antigua) have suffered horribly, yet Antiguans seem to be happily playing their silly little red and blue game, without consideration of how their little "Lord of the Flies" pantomime "country" has, and (god forbid) possibly will have real consequences.
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Pellucid

#32 Get Real » 2010-11-15 15:20

If Antiguans (including Dr. Simon) really wish to support the poor, underdeveloped nation of Japan in their slaughter of whales in the Southern Ocean, they should do exactly what Sea Shepherd does: Raise millions of (real, US) dollars to buy, outfit, supply and fuel a ship. Then raise a crew of 20-30 people willing to leave their families, homes and jobs to to spend 2-3 months living on meager rations, with one 3 minute shower a week, on a freezing boat which could be sunk at any moment.

OK, I'm joshing. I'm sure if any Antiguan were just willing to work, the Japanese would be happy to have them on their (State financed) modern, comfortable factory ship. Well heated, clean, safe, (defended by Japan's Mafia). Still, I bet that "work" part will guarantee that no Antiguan will ever be directly involved.
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Get Real

#31 Wow » 2010-11-15 14:52

A 10 minute google search reveals that Doctor Simon's background research is based on a (in my opinion) valid claim that the Senegalese government has in a dispute against industrial fishing companies which it had a negotiated contract.

If Greenpeace, or Sea Shepherd ships (after raising the necessary hundreds of thousands of US dollars to supply and fuel a vessel paid for with voluntary donations, not to mention a few dozen human beings, willing to give their lives) actually sailed into Senegalese waters, what support would they receive? Is the Senegalese Navy, or any ship controlled or paid by their government in a position to defend such a direct action? What guarantee would the Senegalese government offer to protect these ships against the pirates who also ply their territorial waters, and the people who risk their lives manning them ???

Senegal has (to the best of my knowledge, although I will admit ignorance if there is any proof) NEVER asked for assistance from any Environmental NGO.

If the Cubans teach medicine half as well as propaganda and rhetoric, Dr. Simon will be an invaluable asset to Antigua. If he sticks to his day job.
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Wow

Priceless: animals or people?

#30 Independent » 2010-11-15 10:15

The fact of the matter is that many of these developed nations are where they are today because they exploited nature and other nations to become developed and to maintain their way of life. Whenever they start advocating something they offer "aid", become "friendly" with and if that doesn't work threaten and try to intimidate other countries into supporting their causes. It's sad to say but a lot of the people who so strongly and passionately defend animals seem not to be concerned about the human tragedies that occur each and every day worldwide.
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Independent

#29 Pellucid » 2010-11-15 05:39

What I find most disturbing is that the Antiguan Government thinks that Carnival, sports, and huge SUVs are more important than African children. Clearly, the Antiguan people will bbe willing to pay higher taxes to combat this problem.
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Pellucid

#28 Wham » 2010-11-14 22:43

The difference is sea mammal conservation can not be done in isolation and with indifference to the plight of those who depend on the sea for their survival.
It is not only a moral point but a strategic one. It is also one of credibility.
If you agree it is not only about African children but all children, then the environmental groups have to show that vulnerable children do matter.
Hence like Dr. Simon, one has to ask the question why is this cause not a prominent cry by these groups.
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Wham

@ Jump'n'wave

#27 Sunshine » 2010-11-14 16:59

In the long run it is not just about African children. But if we can not protect African children now, we might not be able to protect yours and all the children of the world later.
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Sunshine

@ Jump and Wave

#26 Wham » 2010-11-14 16:50

whether or not you are in denial, the situation is as Dr. Simon described. He did not invent this story.
I guess, according to you, that these environmental groups will now be jumping to assist in the enforcement of these regulations.
But that like Dr. Simon is asking if they are making so much noise over whaling, why are they not making more noise over this situation.
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Wham

THINK POOR

#25 my way of helping » 2010-11-14 16:24

they might be poor countries and do not have the money to enforce their rights.
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my way of helping

#24 jump 'n wave » 2010-11-14 15:52

Lastly, I have to question the premise that because someone supports a particular cause, they care about nothing else. Breast Cancer,Global Warming, AIDS, Middle East Peace, Sustainable Energy, Disaster Relief, Education, Human Trafficking, those worthy causes are just the ones I could think of faster than it took me to type them. Would you accuse those who actively support any one of those causes of being completely indifferent to all the others?
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jump 'n wave

@ jump and wave

#23 Wham » 2010-11-14 15:44

Whether or not you are in denial, the situation is indeed as Dr. Simon described. This is not a story he invented.
So I guess, according to you, I will see the environmental groups jumping to assist in the enforcement of these regulations.
But as Dr.Simon is asking why has the EU ignored these regulations and why aren't more environmental groups making more noise about it.
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Wham

@Wham

#22 jump 'n wave » 2010-11-14 15:42

Another consideration is: would direct-action groups like Greenpeace and Sea Shepherd be allowed, let alone welcomed or supported in the waters in question? If there are some officials or corporate interests in the countries granting these rights who would use the apparatus of the state to instead support those they are doing business with, at the expense of their country? This is common everywhere (recently in the US it was discovered that those charged with negotiating and regulating oil and gas leases on US land were literally in bed (doing coke) with executives they dealt with.)

Over the summer, both Greenpeace and Sea Shepherd led direct action campaigns in the Mediterranean to try to preserve the dwindling blue fin tuna population which were actively opposed by several European governments, so the association between these groups and European governments, and especially the private entities doing the fishing is clearly a product of imagination and/or a willful ignorance of fact.
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jump 'n wave

@Wham

#21 jump 'n wave » 2010-11-14 15:11

First off, I'm not defending anyone of any nation who uses the sorts of wasteful, inefficient or destructive methods described in the article. Every environmental organization I am aware of is against them. One of Paul Watson's mantras is: If the oceans die, we all die. This isn't about African children, in the long run, it's about all children. The groups Dr. Simon seems to be attacking are all committed to preserving the planet's resources, and ensuring the survival of all of humanity.

What I was saying is that is is the responsibility of the granter of the fishing rights is responsible for enforcement of the fishing regulations. To suggest otherwise would call into question the competence and sovereignty rights of the nations involved. If the situation is as described by Dr. Simon, I'm sure that the environmental organizations would jump at the chance to assist a nation in the enforcement , since recognition of governments is, with the exception of money to continue it's mission, their most desired resource.
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jump 'n wave

@ Jump and wave

#20 Wham » 2010-11-14 13:38

Using your logics why the war against drugs. After all the drug dealers are not pushing anything that is not in great demand.
If Europe can make a point not to buy Blood Diamonds from Africa, why are they buying fish from Africa that may result in the death of African children,
Regardless of the fault of African leaders, Europe is not morally blameless.
Why would you want to defend such low standards.
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Wham

@ Jump and Wave

#19 Hope » 2010-11-14 13:30

Are the regulations unenforceable or has the EU choose not to enforce them. They seem to enforce them very well in EU waters. The ships are European.
And since you mentioned Greenpeace, why are they not jumping on these fishing trawlers the way they jump on whale boats.
Again it begs the question aren't children as important as whales ?
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Hope

@Hope

#18 jump 'n wave » 2010-11-14 13:17

If the fishing rights sold are either to the detriment of the population of the country, or are practically unenforceable, they simply should not be sold.

The aquaculture enterprises are not buying anything which has not been offered for sale.

Now please remind me what all this has to do with environmental organizations like Greenpeace, Sea Shepherds and the World Wildlife Fund who seem to be the target of Dr Simon's rhetoric?
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jump 'n wave

@ Jump and wave

#17 Hope » 2010-11-14 09:13

The article clearly states that the basic agreement that allows Europe to exploit surplus African Marine resources is ignored by the EU.
Africa has to take its blows, but is Europe above criticism?
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Hope

#16 jump 'n wave » 2010-11-14 07:29

It is indeed outrageous that these African countries sell off fishing rights when the know that it will result in the decimation of their own people. I guess you don't have to be a Mugabe and crudely massacre your own people with guns and troops, you can simply starve them and line your Swiss bank account at the same time.
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jump 'n wave

#15 N. Nanton » 2010-11-14 06:00

these large, influential european groups are nothing but a set of hypocrites! how can europeans present themselves as the moral authority on any issue (whether it pertains to humans or animals), while they continuously violate the rights of others in so many ways. for centuries, they have shamelessly forced others into their worldview, while stamping them down into subordination.
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N. Nanton

@ Really

#14 Abijah Hafi » 2010-11-14 05:11

Do not play innocent. No group of people have benefited more from the exploitation of Africa than Europe.
And while lot of Africa's problems are self inflicted we must call a spade s spade. In this issue the Doc has written about, Europe's actions are unacceptable morally and otherwise.
As a African I thank the doctor for having the guts to write what he did.
Sometimes political correctness is just another name for being cowardly.
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Abijah Hafi

@ Author

#13 my way of helping » 2010-11-14 04:26

Lovely article, wow. A very important piece. Everyone as you see is about them self, so i did not expect any nation to want to look out for another nation's resources. It would be nice that we consider everything when we do things and it would be nice if we love enough so we can be fair and just but humans have no regard.

We honestly do not deserve this earth and one another.

Love is the key to solving all our problems.
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my way of helping

Good Article

#12 Buzzbomb » 2010-11-14 03:21

Once again Dr. Simon presents a well written and thought provoking article. By-catch waste is a huge threat to fish stocks and in fact entire marine ecosystems. This destructive and barbaric practice recieves less attention than the whaling issue and should be raised again and again in our public discourse. However, what strikes me most in this piece is that it's also an essay on wealthy nation's exploitation, shameless greed, their wanten destruction for selfish needs and their complete indifference to the environment and mankind in poorer countries.
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Buzzbomb

The thirst for whales continue

#11 Dig It » 2010-11-14 02:57

Well said, Dr. Simon! Something needs to be done with Japan, and its thirst for whales! I believe the problem with the ACP is that it was created to eradicate/reduce poverty, and increase more sustainable development. However, the member states are far from reaching such goals! I always have reservation with the Lome Convention because its trade and aid policies are abusive and exploited! In that, with the lack of leadership we have in the Caribbean region, we'll not be able to "abandon trade with Europe." In our own backyard, in which, the PM denies any bribery claims against our ambassador to IWC from a Japanese firm. Up to this day, niether the Ambassador or the government hasn't produced any documents (receipt from the hotel in Morocco), to deny those allegations.
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Dig It

@ Wayne

#10 Morris » 2010-11-14 02:43

Prevention is better than cure. The problems that the doctor high lighted are usually the root causes to why people will be seen by him. Without adequate food to nourish and strengthen the body, it will become vulnerable to diseases and infections; which will cause you to visit the doctor. Think outside of the box.
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Morris

@ Dr. Simon

#9 Morris » 2010-11-14 02:36

Dr. Simon I must applaud you for addressing a very serious issue. However, one point that you fail to mention is that many of the developed countries have very powerful environmentalist groups who receive lots of funding to lobby for those laws you mentioned to protect/conserve what they have for future generations. The developing countries do not have such organizations to look out for their interests hence the abuse.

I must add that there are many marine conservationists groups around the world that are echoing the sentiments of your article, but, unfortunately, they lack the financial resources to wage any meaningful campaign against the establishment. The message will only get through if we are able to pool our resources together under one umbrella/coalition and let our voices be heard.

Fishing is only one of the many factors contributing to poverty, poor health, and death in these developing countries. I suggest you research the impact of military exercises on developing countries for your next piece. You will be very surprised at what you find.
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Morris

Nice

#8 Wayne » 2010-11-14 02:22

Nice to know that an apparently young Dr. can find the time to speak of an issue that does not seek to be of direct benefit to his practice.
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Wayne

#7 Cool Ruler » 2010-11-14 02:21

Some of you need to read the book "how Europe underdevelop africa" by Walter Rodney. we will see that even after centuries of colonialism the exploitation of African countries continues to this day with the complicity of many of their leaders.
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Cool Ruler

thanks

#6 tenman » 2010-11-14 02:07

as usual Doctor Simon very informative and thought provoking. Recall some years ago asking a friend who is an ardent advocate for dogs why she does not show that same fervor for destitute persons. Her answer was that dogs or animals do not have a say in their destiny, people do. I have always found it interesting that we find it so easy to ignore the tenant that we should practice charity to our fellowmen.

..
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tenman

#5 Really? » 2010-11-14 02:01

Who exactly is "Europe"?? Sea Shepherd, the most highly publicized anti-whaling group, was founded by a Canadian, is based in the United States and operates it's defense of the Southern Ocean from Australia. If you peruse their website, you will see that they do speak out against all of the abuses you cite (bottom trawling, longlining and purse seines.)

Also, the developed world has suffered, and continues to suffer from the same flawed, inefficient fishing mentioned in your piece. The collapse of the North Atlantic cod fisheries and the imminent extinction of Blue Fin Tuna from overfishing in the Mediterranean show that this is, first, a global crisis which should be addressed by all people on all continents, and second, is completely unrelated to conservation groups sacrificing their time, effort and private resources.

If this is meant as an appeal to end abusive, destructive and unsustainable fishing practices, anywhere in the world, it would be far more effective without the first four paragraphs. If it is an attempt to tar conservation groups with the brush of racism and genocide, it fails miserably.
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Really?

#4 DImples » 2010-11-14 01:52

Very Informative since we were not aware of the situation that is happening!
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DImples

abc

#3 abc » 2010-11-14 01:50

It would be useful if Caribarena articles posted their sources as well....something like wikipedia
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abc

very informative and educational

#2 fnpsr » 2010-11-14 01:48

As usual a very informative and educational piece. It is very evident that the Europeans have developed a "not in my backyard syndrome " policy. I thank you for taking the time to expose this policy.
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fnpsr

#1 Dessalines » 2010-11-13 22:51

Very insightful article Dr Simon. I look forward to hearing this discussed on the airwaves for those of us who do not have Internet access or not in the habit of reading.
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Dessalines

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Dr. Jerry Simon

Dr.Jerry Simon,a general physician, is a graduate of the University of the West Indies and Villa Clara (Cuba) Medical School. He has previously worked in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry. Presently he is Medical Director of the NSA Medical Surgical Rehab Centre and is a certified member of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

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