WRONG_WOEID WRONG_WOEID

A Nation Grappling with Litigation

Free from bias?When Sir Novelle Hamilton Richards, Statesman, Diplomat and author wrote the National Anthem [1967], through patriotism, foresight and words of wisdom, he had depicted a “...Model Nation” for its peace-loving and law abiding people.

The Anthem focuses on two significant concepts- the “...Ideals of the nation” and the “...Commitments of its people.” Few may have been seen as profound as the opening stanza that described the nation as “...Fair Antigua and Barbuda.” For all intents and purposes, Sir Novelle had viewed the concept “...Fairness” as denoting a people “...Free from bias; ...void of dishonesty; ...loathing Injustice; and welcoming “...fair judge and fair Decision” [Dictionary .Com].

JUSTICE AND FAIR PLAY

As it affects “...Justice and Fair Play, Fairness also speaks to entitlements “...legitimately sought or pursued; ...done or given; ...proper under the rules and include a fair fight,” be it physical (sanctioned boxing) or legal (Judicial proceedings). These Ideals reflect not only a “...Model Nation,” but also the hope and aspirations of Sir MacLean Emanuel an advocate for “...Social Justice,” insisting” in his social commentary “...Our Pledge” that “...We want not just a society, but a JUST society.” He had envisioned challenges with hurdles that might be insurmountable, yet he was optimistic that the people may show resilience and a determination in overcoming them; ...that all may live in a peaceful society where man is free” [Anthem]. He had encouraged civic virtue in the citizenry.

REASONABLE EXPECTATIONS

More fundamentally, there are the “...Reasonable Expectations” of the people with optimism and hope of a brighter tomorrow. But who said that man may not see, give or make trouble? Sir Novelle was mindful of the Scripture that warns “...Man that is born of a woman is of few days, and full of trouble” [Job 14:1]. Thus, it was anticipated that in the few days of man’s existence, there were to be plenty human troubles-some spiritual and immoral governmental and some legal. However, that which Sir Novelle had conceived and believed may not be achievable or attainable unless the citizenry and the leadership recognize the task ahead. These were to be realized only when the citizenry show that they were united in the fight against the forces of evil.

COMMITMENTS OF THE PEOPLE

Sir Novelle wanted a nation free of evildoers and a people not laden with inequity. Therefore, each was to accept his duties and responsibilities, discharging them faithfully and to the best of his ability. Conversely, the State was to act in good faith in the interest of the people and the ultimate good of humanity. Consequently, he implored loyal and patriotic citizens that in building a “...Model Nation” they should “...Spare nothing, but giving all; ...that each citizen should gird his loin and join the battle against fear, hate and poverty.” Hence, they were not only to live in harmony, but also to be “...Ever striving and ...Ever seeking to dwell in love and unity.” Then there were the suggested “...Commitments of the People.” Sir Novelle expected all citizens to demonstrate a collective will, strengthened by a steely resolve in “...Committing themselves to building a true nation, brave and free; ...that the people fought painstakingly and unceasingly in “...defending not only the nation’s liberty,” but also that of every man, woman and child.

APPORTIONING BLAME

Seemingly without the benefit of substantiating facts, many citizens and some litigants, have apportioned blame to the nation’s chief legal advisor, Attorney General Justin L, Simon QC, for “...their legal and/or financial woes” resulting from protracted litigious proceedings. These, they may have argued, run against the “...National Ideals” and founding Constitutional principle in which they may have been rightly or wrongly denied the privilege to “...Assert their conviction that their ’Happiness and Prosperity’ can best be pursued in a democratic society in which all persons, may, to the extent of their capacity continue to play some part in the national life” [C.O: 1981: Founding Principle c]. For reasons of their own experiences, former Senators Collin Derrick and Anthony Stewart may have perceived the “...Executive” as being plagued with “...mal-administration and mal-spending; ...lacking transparency, accountability; ...wanting of integrity in public life; and administered through acrimonious and egregious actions.”

ANTHEM/OATH OF OFFICE

Many citizens saw these as affecting the conceptualized “...Model of a Nation” by Sir Novelle as contained in the National Anthem and the subscribed Oath of office by portfolioed Ministers of Government. For instance, in the cases of the Attorney General and Finance Minister, singularly, each had sworn to (i) “...uphold and preserve the Constitution of Antigua and Barbuda and the Law;   (ii) ...conscientiously, impartially and to the best of my ability discharge my duties and ‘DO RIGHT’ to all manner of people, without fear of favor, malice or ill-will” [CO: 1981: Schedule 3]. Collectively, they share responsibilities for the efficient administration of all public affairs - legally and financially. Hence, it was not enough for individual Executive members to dissociate himself from decisions considered “...adverse and/or irrational.” Thus, it was not enough to heap blame on any one individual, neither on the Prime Minister nor the Attorney General or “...Chester, Chanlah and Namba.”

NON-COMBATIVE

A nation that prides itself as “...Fair Antigua and Barbuda” has never been in combative wars, neither with its regional partners nor members of the international community. Even if the thought of such “...adventurism” was entertained over “...Flour; ...Cement and Offshore Gaming,” it has neither the resources nor the military capabilities to do so. It boasts no “...Army, Air Force or Navy” in embarking on armed aggression or defending itself against such aggression. Except for two regional “ ...Trade wars over Flour” that speaks to “...monopoly, quota, quality and over pricing” with St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Grenada [2006]; ...a Cement friction with Trinidad Cement Limited (TCL) [2009] linked with other members of CARICOM respecting the contentious “...Suspension of Common External Tariff (CET) and a protracted international “...Offshore Gaming Dispute” with the United States [2005], the nation was known for its peaceful people and cooperative spirit in both regional and international affairs.

FLOUR SQUABBLE

In the “...Flour Squabble,” research showed that “...Negotiations between Antigua and Barbuda and source countries St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Grenada on support for placing wheat flour on Article 164 list of industries within the Less Developed Countries (LDC’s) to receive protection from like industries in the More Developed Countries (MDC’s), had failed to reach a comprehensive agreement.” In an attempt to break the monopolistic hold on the regional”...Flour market,” the nation had proposed “...an allocated percentage,” whereby it may have sourced the commodity from other markets. Speaking to contentious issues raised, Trade Representative Ambassador Dr. Clarence Henry said “...St. Vincent and Grenada were not in support of our proposal of allocating 25% of our market for packaged flour to the More Developed Countries (MDC’s) while OECS Mills control the remaining 75%” [Grenada Today: April 8, 2006].

A BELLIGERENT DR. HENRY

With some degree of belligerence, Dr. Clarence Henry reportedly said that the nation “...Wanted more choices and better prices.” The position taken by the nation had resulted in flour imports from Guyana. The squabble had left Importers and Bakers scrambling and crying for losses, while consumers complained of the inferiority in texture of product made from the alternatively sourced commodity. Further research revealed that some measure of success was achieved, but only to the extent that the nation’s concerns were addressed. In their final agreements, the regional flour producing countries had sought to address inter alia “...pricing; ...frequent shortages and the ...quality of the 100lb sacks” [Grenada Today].

CEMENT TROUBLES

In the “...Cement Troubles” with Trinidad Cement Limited (TCL), the nation had picked no fight with TCL. Its annexure in the litigious proceedings was one of association with its CARICOM partners. Nonetheless, they all had a common understanding that TCL monopolistic agreements might be severed. Thus, an apparent “...procedural glitch” had landed the community before the CARIBBEAN Court of Justice (CCJ). TCL had taken issue with the “...Suspension of the Common External Tariff (CET) by the Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) [November 24, 2009], for sourcing the commodity from “...Caribbean Cement, Jamaica. Consequently, TCL had instituted litigious proceedings before the CCJ, in which judgement was obtained against CARICOM. The CCJ had determined that the move had lacked protocol and void of consultations. It was ordered to bear one half of the cost for the proceedings. [CCJ APN: No. OA: 1 of 2009: January 19, 2009].

FOUNDING PRINCIPLES

The Constitution of Antigua and Barbuda speaks to “...five founding principles” upon which it was envisaged by insightful and prudent men, that “...A Model Nation” was to be built. Each, principle speaks to critical issues that were to exist within civil and democratic societies. Fundamentally, these were to include matters of “...Spirituality; ...Social Justice and Obedience to the Law.” For instance, the people were to proclaim (i) “...The Supremacy of God.” This principle allows for “...Freedom of Conscience.” Some Employers have been accused of ignoring this Constitutional principle, thereby imposing their will upon, and/or sanctions against those who were desirous to attend “...Divine Service on a Saturday or Sunday.” That said, Employees shall know that on such days when the exigencies of duties do not permit, meditating quietly on the job, may just turn away the inescapable “...wrath” of some Managers [Proverbs 15:1 ASV].”

FREEDOM OF CONSCIENCE

As it affects “...Freedom of Conscience,” Section 11 states “...Except with his own consent no person shall be hindered in the enjoyment of his freedom of conscience.” This includes the “...freedom either alone, or in community with others, and both in public and private to manifest and propagate his religion and belief in worship, teaching, practice and observance.” It might be seen from the number of denominational institutions and groups, that the people believe in the existence of a “...Supreme Being.” Then there is the people’s declaration to show (ii) “...Respect for Social justice.” This principle speaks to citizen’s “...belief that the operation of their economic system should result in the material resources of the nation being so distributed among its people, as to serve not just the interest of a privileged few, but the “ ...common good” [Constitution Order 1981].

RULE OF LAW

It was the experience that where there was a breakdown of order in civil society, human behaviors have often triggered events resulting from lawlessness, chaos and confusion. As a democracy, modern civilization dictates that Antigua and Barbuda is administered and/or governed by the “...Rule of Law.” This concept seeks, inter alia, to promote an enabling social environment and apolitically and industrially stable atmosphere. It also seeks to ensure“...societal orderliness; ...peace among men and goodwill between the citizens and the State. Constitutionally, it calls for “...recognition by the citizens that the Law symbolizes the public conscience with unqualified acceptance that every citizen owes to it undivided allegiance.”

PRIVATE VIEWS OF JUSTICE

The Constitution Order 1981, urges the citizenry that in their quest for Justice, that which may be seen as adverse to their interest, citizens were not to be “... limited by any private views of Justice or expediency.” This however, was to be contingent upon clear understandings that the State would be governed by “...Just men and Just Laws; That there shall be fairness in their execution and that citizens may employ less time and expend less resources in litigious proceedings in determining their “...rationality and reasonability of some decisions and the legitimacy and applicability of some Laws.” Most importantly, the citizenry were expected to accept the Law as “...Fair and just.” For instance, citizens were not only to see that the State demonstrating good faith its acceptance of “...well reasoned Judicial Decisions,’ but also subject itself to its enacted Laws.

STATUTORY FIDUCIARY DUTY

The long running legal battle over the contentious “...Compensatory Settlement” for property compulsorily acquired from HMB, had met a number of snags, either “...legally or financially.” In the Court’s adjudication “ ...March 4-8, 2013,” High Court Justice Jennifer Remy had determined and ruled that Finance Minister Harold Lovell had a “ ...Statutory Fiduciary Duty” to discharge to Claimants HMB Holdings for properties his administration had compulsorily acquired from the Claimants pursuant to the provisions under the Land Acquisition Act Chapter 233. In 2005 the Government had moved swiftly in registering the properties as the new proprietor. The Court‘s Judgment [Claim No. ANUCV2012/0727: Para c & d] reflected  irrefutable submissions that “ ...On January 5, 2010, the three-member appointed Board of Assessment of Justice Harris; ...Businessman Victor Michael and Attorney-at-law Joyce Kentish delivered its award of US$23, 820, 999M, with Interest thereon at the rate of 10.25% per annum from July 2007 and Cost of US42, 090. 00.”

BOARD’S ASSESSMENT

Seemingly, Attorney General Justin L. Simon QC had accepted the initial ruling of the Court based on the Board’s Assessment for both “...Compensation and Interest Rate of 10.25% per annum” as fair, reasonable and equitable. However, when HMB Holdings launched its appeal against that which it had considered “...unfair, unreasonable and inequitable,” the Appellate Court ruled in its favor on December 5, 2011, and increased the “...Compensatory Award” to US$45, 499, 102.09. Notwithstanding the compensatory increase by the Appellate Court, the Award remains that of the Board of Assessment.

LITIGIOUS SEQUEL

It has often been said that “...Justice delayed is Justice denied.” It was clearly not for the want of trying and/or offering the best professionally rational advice on that which “...may or may not be litigated.” Even with the prestigious ‘QC’ suffixing his name, Attorney General Justin L. Simon may have found himself in an unenviable position in the see-saw-like “...Litigious Sequel” involving the State. For instance, in the HMB Holdings litigious actions, nationals appeared circumspect over the litigious path he had embarked upon against the citizens-individually and private Corporations. In the HMB case, he had made application to the Appellate Court on December 23, 2011, for “...Conditional Leave to appeal to Her Majesty in Council against the Judgment of the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court (ECSC). Displaying adroitness, the Attorney General had sought persuasively, yet unsuccessfully in delaying payment through a “...Stay of Execution” of its Judgment.

HALF WAY JUDGMENT

Sensing a subtle attempt to avoid or delay the execution of the Compensatory Judgment, albeit for pre-conceived appellate reasons, the distinguished Justices of Appeal, met the learned Attorney General “...Half Way.” Thus, when he was allowed to take their “...Increased Compensatory Judgment” to the London Privy Council he had won half, but lost the “...better half,” when the application for a “...Stay of Execution” was refused. Such refusal seemed to have placed both the Attorney General in (i) ... An awkward Position; (ii) ...Finance Minister in a precarious position; and (iii) ...HMB in an Advantageous position to seek the compulsion “...Order of Mandamus.” Even “...Hard- Necked Defendants knows he,” might easily be cited for “...Contempt of Court” for disobedience to a Court order.



GROUNDS OF THE APPLICATION

Based upon the “...Grounds of the Application,” numbering four, inclusive of coercive compliance with the provisions under the Land Acquisition Act that imposes a “...Statutory Duty” upon a Minister of Finance in settlement of his “...judicially ordered Compensatory obligations.” In the ruling, HMB’s Order of Mandamus states “ ...To compel the Respondent Harold Lovell in his capacity as Minister of Finance and the person required under the Land Acquisition Act, Cap 233 to comply with his statutory duty under Section 29 to issue a Warrant for the ‘PAYMENT’ of Compensation; ...Interest and ...Costs awarded to the Applicant by the Board of Assessment constituted under the Act, which Compensation award was increased by the Court of Appeal along with further Costs assessed by the High Court in relation to the compulsory acquisition of lands as registered as Registration Section, St. Phillips South, Block: 32 3282A; Parcels 55, 56, 57, (the said acquisition),’ the Applicant being the registered proprietor at the time of acquisition.” The further Costs of US$104, 285 and 82 cents were added by the High Court on June 1, 2012” [Para 2:1].

PERILOUS ORDER OF MANDAMUS

Finance Minister Harold Lovell, an attorney of vast legal knowledge and experience. He had a successful legal career and private practice. Thus, he may have been reckless not to be au fait with the Court’s rules, procedures and powers, including the perilous consequences that may be occasioned for disobeying the Court’s orders. He was also aware of that which might have descended from the Court’s gavel. Thus, there has always been the possibility of being committed to the penal institution without the option of a fine for “...contemptuous behavior.” Their “ ...Worst Fears” came through when HMB took advantage of its position and successfully applied to the High Court of Justice for Leave to apply for the “ ...Perilous Order of Mandamus” [November 7, 2012].There was no doubt the Justice Jennifer Remy had been as studious as she had been meticulous in her adjudicating duties. Undoubtedly, she may have given acute considerations, not only to the issues at Bar, but also the implications for the liberties of the holder of the office of Finance Minister. Ironically, he had initially opposed the acquisition of the property in question. Now he was facing a dilemma in paying for that which he had, in earnest opposed under another administration.

CASE ON POINT

In its consideration, the Court appeared to have paid special attention to the case “...Gairy v Attorney General of GRENADA [CIV AP: No. 7of 1999: Para 17]. Referencing the dicta of  former Chief Justice and President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), Sir Dennis Byron, the High Court Justice had looked keenly at the case of “ ...R. v Cummings for Special Purposes.” It states “ ...There can be no objection to the grant of relief by way of Mandamus directed to a Statutory officer requiring that officer to PAY MONEY  if there be a public legal duty to so act, and that Mandamus will issue not only to compel exercise of the discretion according to law, but also to compel it to be exercised in the way in which it must be exercised” [21 QB. 313, 322: and Para 6 of Judgment of HMB Holdings (Claimant) and Harold Lovell (Defendant-capacity of Minister of Finance) [ANUHCV 2012/0727].

GAIRY v AG OF GRENADA

Interestingly, while the dapper and eloquent Finance Minister sought to impress upon the Court the nation’s financial difficulties in discharging his Statutory duty, Justice Jennifer Remy had taken guidance from the “ ...Gairy v Attorney General of Grenada. She had looked at Paragraphs 7 and 31 that states, “...The fiscal difficulties of a government do not constitute justification for the refusal to grant an Order of Mandamus.” However, cognizance of the nation’s economic plight, the Court had considered “...partial satisfaction” of the compensatory award” that was to be paid to HMB Holdings by January 2010” [Para 12 © of Judgment].

CONCLUSION

When litigants and other citizens, including public officers applied “...Fairness” to the role and functions of the Judiciary, Executive and Legislature, many have viewed it with mixed feelings. While some had related “...Fairness” to well reasoned Judicial Decisions, others saw perversion in the administration and/or dispensation of Justice.” Applying the concept Fairness to the “...Executive and the Legislature,” to dissatisfied, disgruntled and/or aggrieved citizens, it could mean anything. In this context, Sir Gerald Watt KCN, QC, may have seen the Legislature as “...legislatively oppressive.” Notwithstanding, such private views of Justice, a gritty and determined Prime Minister Dr. Baldwin Spencer were to show that recent appellate decisions against his “ ...Executive Decisions” may have been flawed, signaling to  Sir Gerald that with his next move to the London Privy Council, his “...Squabbles and Legal Troubles” were far from over. Such course might very well be seen by the citizenry as going against the founding “...Constitutional Principles” and the spirit of the Law and that which was envisaged as the “...Model of a Nation” where the people and State administrators may “...dwell in love and unity” in avoidance of the protracted and debilitating consequences of litigious and mental agony.

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16 Comments In This Article   

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RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#16 Annita » 2013-06-19 18:27

Rawlston Pompey,
You missed your calling was meant as a compliment as I think you are an exceptional, exceptional writer!!
You attacked me as if I was stupid and in a profound pompas arrogant way that makes you think you are above us all. I also see your other responses to different Antiguans. Don’t criticize us for having an opinion about what you are writing. You,, fine Sir,,,, have no idea where we are all coming from!!!! Let me clue you in…… We are for the people, get it??? The people are the ones that have to pay in the long run!!
The point is, we voted these guys into office because we thought they were going to represent our people with integrity in a forthright honest way. That hasn’t happened!
With all the other court cases proves that the Government is not working in the best interest of the people. Who is paying all the legal costs for this? (The People)
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RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#15 Time to pay » 2013-06-19 12:08

PS: TO ALL OF ANTIGUA...!!!!!! CAN WE NOT FIND SOMEONE TO RUN OUR GOVERNMENT RIGHT. PEOPLE THAT FOLLOW THE LAWS OF THE LAND....! MAYBE WE NEED TO ASK THE QUEEN TO TAKE US BACK AND LET ENGLAND GOVERN US... FOR THE PEOPLE WE HAVE PUT IN OFFICE CLEARLY ARE NOT ACTING AS THEY SHOULD. TIME TO VOTE THEM OUT...

YES YES LET US ASK THE QUEEN TO TAKE US BACK.. THEN OUR CHILDEN CAN ALSO WORK AND GO TO SCHOOL IN THE UK. FOR CLEARLY WE CANNOT SEE LIGHT WITH ONE PARTY OR THE OTHER..! THIS LAND NEEDS HELP FAST BEFORE WE FALL ALL INTO THE SEA...! :-*
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Time to pay

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#14 Time to pay » 2013-06-19 12:00

Spencer>>>>> What are you thinking letting Simon and Lovell cost us tax payers all this high interest at 10.25% on the HMB matter. Why are you letting Simon keep dragging this matter on. You know ... we all know that at the end of the day pay HMB is the out come. Why cost us 6 Months more interest... Why.. I ask you why... Do not hide on this matter. You need to address this as well. We the Tax payers have a right to know why you are letting this cost us more and more.


Who is the law firm helping Simon... ? What is that costing us the tax payer??? we have the right to know .... !!!! :sigh:
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Time to pay

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#13 Time to pay » 2013-06-19 11:56

Simon... Do you really think you can push the HMB under the rug...! Look the law is the law.. The Government took the land.. the Old boys had a game plan with Stanford... well so be it. Now you need to pay HMB the 73 Mill + what costs of over 104 Mill really... Now you what to drag it out another 6 months so it costs us even more. Are you mad or just foolish....? :oops:
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Time to pay

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#12 Time to pay » 2013-06-19 11:53

It is Clear to all that can read... that Lovell , Simon and Spencer, Are playing delay games. The law is clear. So why the delay re paying HMB. It is only costing us more money each day the Government delays... We all can see what the Government did was not right and now we all will pay. So Lovell the 45 odd Mill clearly you have it working in some Government investment making more then the 10.25% we have to pay HMB...! Clearly a man of your Standing has things in order to pay this matter off shortly.

Lovell Simon is not giving you good direction at all is he? Lovell you are starting to look like a fish out of water...! :-x :cry: :o
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Time to pay

SENTIMENTALITY

#11 RAWLSTON POMPEY » 2013-06-18 23:09

CIROC,
Your comments suggest that you are not someone of weak mental intellect.Never seen you as ever seeking to display an " ...Impressionist posture." Don't be fooled by big words or sentimentality.

The commentaries published with consistency at this website are not for such purposes.

You know that some people have nothing to offer, not even for our enlightenment.

If they did, they may have been making meaningful contributions, other than vainly seeking public attention.
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RAWLSTON POMPEY

Free From Bias

#10 Hamlet » 2013-06-18 22:28

Mr. Pompey - Antiguan by Heart. Wonderful piece. Wonderful.
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Hamlet

BENEFIT OF READERS

#9 RAWLSTON POMPEY » 2013-06-18 21:46

The Mighty Sparrow knew what he was singing when he said;

" ...Half the trouble in the world today, comes from people who don't know what to say;
...They like to use words that is big and long, and don't know when they using it wrong;" [Social commentary- MOPPERS].

These are the definitions of " ...Obfuscate;

(i) ...To confuse;
(ii) ...Bewilder
(iii) ...Stupefy

See comment No. 6:
" ...not obfuscate the issues and further confuse."
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RAWLSTON POMPEY

@POMPEY

#8 CIROC » 2013-06-18 21:23

Me,voiced an opinion in regards to your opinions.You as the moral authority lashed out with disdain and insults.No wonder Antigua is where it is because of high and mighty people like you.All the person is asking of you.Make your comments more plucid. Is that too hard.It sounds like how dare anyone question me.I am a former chief of police.Give "ME" a break.
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CIROC

PITY YOUR SIMPLICITY

#7 RAWLSTON POMPEY » 2013-06-18 11:50

ME,
Sure you are no more educated, intelligent, brighter or wiser than the other commentators who seemed to understand what they have read.

Hold not the author responsible for any deficiencies. However, if
you understand what you are about to read, then your " ...IQ" ought to be above average or high to share with us what had confused your mind.


Seemingly, it was your " ...lack of comprehension or being too naive" that may have caused your mind to be confused.

Might we empathize with you and ...PITY for your ...SIMPLICITY?
Hell no! Back to night school. You may just learn something.
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RAWLSTON POMPEY

Say What?

#6 Me » 2013-06-18 10:13

Your analysis ought to have elucidated the matter of which you speak . . . not obfuscate the issues and further confuse.
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Me

BRAVO Mr. Pompey, BRAVO

#5 skyewill » 2013-06-18 07:31

I enjoyed this opinion piece. it strikes to the heart of what I stand for. It took me back to Antigua Grammar School on a day when sang the National Anthem. It reminded me of why I stay involved and why I should always add my voice and stand up against those who seek to rule by ego and selfishness. As I read,"Applying the concept Fairness to the “...Executive and the Legislature,” to dissatisfied, disgruntled and/or aggrieved citizens" AND "contingent upon clear understandings that the State would be governed by “...Just men and Just Laws; FOR I TO have a vision of a harmonious and modernized Antigua & Barbuda; an economic powerhouse in the Caribbean; a country of equality of opportunity and justice irrespective of colour, creed or class.Browne G. (2012). MP Browne Opens His Innings. Retrieved from http://www.Caribarena.com/antigua/news/politics/101968-mp-browne-opens-his-innings.html Caribarena.com
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skyewill

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#4 SlyThatGuy » 2013-06-18 07:05

Rawlston Pompey, your opinion about our National Anther is from out in left field, and I can't imagine where you got that from. The word FAIR (the very first word) in our National Anthem speaks only of Beauty, nothing about justice or fairness. So your whole concept here is wrong .
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SlyThatGuy

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#3 Beef » 2013-06-18 06:04

Good piece.
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Beef

RE: A Nation Grappling with Litigation

#2 Justice » 2013-06-18 05:51

Rawlston Pompey; You are so Prophetic. WOW! Like in Belshazzar's case in Daniel: 5- 26 in this case UPP; This is the interpretation of the thing: MENE; God has numbered your kingdom, and finished it. 27 TEKEL; You are weighed in the balances, and are found wanting. 28 PERES; Your kingdom is divided, and given to the Medes and Persians. …
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Justice

Litigation?

#1 Jimmy » 2013-06-18 04:32

More to come...starting with the Boundary Gerrymandering case this week! Them too want to tief the Elections! The Court going have to stop them again!
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Jimmy

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