WRONG_WOEID WRONG_WOEID

Lowering the Heat on CARICOM Travel and Trade

L- Minister A J Nicholson and Minister Winston DookeranFull appreciation is due to Jamaica’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, A J Nicholson, for taking the initiative to invite Trinidad and Tobago’s Foreign Minister Winston Dookeran for talks over travel and trade issues that had reached boiling point between the two Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries. 

Equally, Dookeran deserves credit for the level-headed, unassuming and sympathetic manner in which he treated the discussions with members of the Jamaica government and the private sector.

Between the two men they lowered the heat on these contentious issues that threatened to scorch relations between their two countries.  In this sense, they were the right men in the right place at a perilous time.  Two different personalities might have poured oil on troubled waters for narrow political gain by playing-up to nationalistic sentiment.



They have been wise in agreeing that in respect of “entry and stay” in CARICOM member countries, immigration officers must be guided by what is now clearly “Community Law” as instituted by Heads of Government and given clarity by the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ).  In the case of the 13 Jamaicans who were denied entry to Trinidad and Tobago on 19 November, the rules as set out by the CCJ were not followed.  Now, both Nicholson and Dookeran have agreed that the CCJ ruling must be implemented, and the Chief Immigration Officers of CARICOM countries should convene a meeting to review instances of “profiling”. Both sides also agreed that “there is a need for further training of immigration officers to effectively facilitate the hassle-free travel of Community nationals”.

The news that Attorneys-General of the 15-nation Caribbean Community, or their representatives, have also been discussing the implementation of the CCJ ruling is a positive step.  In the words of the Jamaica Prime Minister, Portia Simpson-Miller, treating CARICOM nationals at CARICOM airports properly “is a matter of dignity”.  The efforts by Nicholson and Dookeran must now be translated into transparent machinery at the bilateral level, but all CARICOM countries must do the same.

At the same time, there should be education in every CARICOM country about precisely what the CCJ ruling means – a task to which the CCJ itself should consider contributing.   An impression appears to have been created that CARICOM nationals need only turn up at entry points in other CARICOM countries to be granted entry and the right to remain for six months.  This is not necessarily so.  Heads of Government did not agree to free movement of people across the borders of CARICOM countries as applies, for instance, among the 27 Member States of the European Union. What they agreed to is entitlement “to an automatic stay of six months upon arrival” but subject to “the rights of Member States to refuse undesirable persons entry and to prevent persons from becoming a charge on public funds”.

The CCJ in its decision carefully explained that “in contradistinction to foreigners in general, nationals do have a right of entry to enter the territory of Member States unless they qualify for refusal under the two exceptions mentioned above”. It seems, therefore, that where it is clear that nationals do not have the means to keep themselves and there are no relatives or friends who have provided documentation taking responsibility for them during their stay, immigration authorities would be right in assuming that they could become charges on the public purse and so deny them entry provided they are given a written explanation, the opportunity to call a lawyer or their Consul, and the right to appeal the decision.

The CCJ decision stops capricious or malicious denial of entry to CARICOM nationals by immigration authorities and provides rules by which any denial must be guided. Of course, it does not legislate that CARICOM nationals should be treated with “dignity” as the Jamaican Prime Minister rightly asserted should be part of the process.  Treating people with dignity comes only from an appreciation of mankind’s common humanity, and an understanding that in the inter-Caribbean rivalry of past colonial governments and plantation owners, the people of the Caribbean were victims not beneficiaries.  That rivalry was the rivalry of “masters” not slaves and servants. Rivalry and antagonism didn’t serve the interests of the Caribbean people then, and it doesn’t do so now.

Treating CARICOM nationals with dignity cannot be legislated, but it can be encouraged and taught.  Since many immigration officers have been trained to treat foreign tourists with dignity and respect, perhaps the training should be extended to include the Caribbean people who share the same history, live in the same geographical space and depend on the co-operation and support of each other to forge a beneficial place for themselves in the international community.  

On the trade issues between Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago, it is less clear what has been agreed.  But, at least the unhelpful proposal of a boycott by Jamaicans of Trinidad and Tobago products appears to have been quietened.  Mr Nicholson is to visit Trinidad and Tobago early next year and maybe by then concrete ways of addressing the trade issue will have been worked out.


 But, it is as well to note here that while for the three years 2010-2012, Jamaica had a balance of trade deficit with Trinidad and Tobago of US$2.3 billion, more than 80% of Jamaica’s imports was for mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials that the country would have had to import anyway – and probably at a higher price had it chosen to do so from other places.  When the cost of mineral fuels and related materials are subtracted from the Jamaica trade deficit with Trinidad and Tobago, the figure for the three years 2010 to 2012 is US$329.3 million – still high but not as daunting as US$2.3 billion.  Further economic co-operation between the two countries in production integration, mergers and investment would redound to the benefit of both, and to the wider CARICOM region.

Messrs Nicholson and Dookeran in their constructive discussions and in their search for solutions provided a whiff of the aroma that once permeated the Caribbean integration project and excited its people.  They have given an example for others to follow.


P.S.    Since writing this commentary I have seen the comments of the Trinidad and Tobago Minister of National Security and Immigration Gary Griffith that questioned the understandings on entry of CARICOM nationals reached by his government's Foreign Minister with the Foreign Minister of Jamaica A J Nicholson.  His remarks are unfortunate, particularly his cavalier statement that “T&T is not a mall, where anyone will be allowed entry.”  They undermine the credibility not only of his government’s Foreign Minister but also of his Prime Minister who authorised Dookeran’s visit to Jamaica to talk with Jamaica’s Foreign Minister and others with a view to finding agreed solutions to the issues of trade and travel.  Mr Griffith has violated the principle of collective responsibility of Cabinet within his own government.  However, judgement on whether he has actually undone the admirable efforts of Dookeran or simply vented his personal spleen, must now await the response of the Trinidad and Tobago government and its Prime Minister.  

Sir Ronald Sanders is a Consultant, Senior Research Fellow at London University and former Caribbean Diplomat.

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37 Comments In This Article   

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Sore loser

#37 King Court » 2013-12-17 13:45

Tenman, your foolishness knows no end, I wonder how you managed at Midwestern University, no amount of logics can ever explain your conceit. Show me where in the Gleaner IMF report reference was made to SEDLAC 2002 stats. You selected the ficticious information to escape my winning argument. Read the article again an again until you truly understand. You are a sore loser!
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King Court

mek up your mind

#36 tenman » 2013-12-14 20:13

King Court it was you who pointed to the Gleaner article which used a report from the IMF that referenced SEDAC income based poverty measure (data up to 2002). I gather now you have decided to wheel and come again. Its funny how its now changed from the conditions in JA being as bad or near to Haiti to an argument about things in JA being great. Funny thing is I never said they were great. I simply stated there are nowhere as bad as Haiti.

Anyway the link you provided the stats do not load for poorest countries. I was able to find another link (http://afrimarketing.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_31.html), which used the PPP method, looking at poorest countries. It rated Haiti as number 20 (Congo was the worst and so scored Guyana 88, Belize 90, Jamaica at 91, St. Vincent at 106, Saint Kitts 125, Antigua & Barbuda 132, Barbados 146, France 160, USA 178, Canada . Tell me again how this is showing that Jamaica is closest to Haiti even regionally? Your own referenced data keeps making a lie of the suggestion.
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tenman

Your foolishness knows no end

#35 King Court » 2013-12-13 16:46

'Tenman' I have decided to engage you a little longer, since your foolishness knows no end. I am sending you some more material to basically understand the purchasing power parity (PPP) as expresssed in GDP PPP.

"The measure that most economists prefer is GDP at purchasing power parity. GDP (PPP) compares generalized differences in living standards on the whole between nations because PPP takes into account the relative cost of living and the inflation rates of countries, rather than using just exchange rates, which may distort the real differences in income."

Refer to Global Finance 'Poorest Countries in the World" info sourced from IMF, review the link below, download accordingly:

http://www.gfmag.com/component/content/article/119-economic-data/12537-the-poorest-countries-in-the-world.html#axzz2nOAckwWC

I will say nothing more after this!
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King Court

poverty data

#34 tenman » 2013-12-13 10:00

King Cort, the very organization (SEDLAC)where the report got its 43.3% states about poverty measures:
Quote:
Even though we recognize that household consumption is often a better measure of welfare than household income, a practical reason justifies the use of family income as the welfare proxy in this project: few countries in Latin America and the Caribbean implement routinely households surveys with consumption or expenditure questionnaires, while all countries include questions on individual and family income.

While most countries have expenditure surveys, they are usually carried out with long intervals of time (in many cases, every 10 years), so they are not suitable for monitoring poverty, inequality and other relevant social indicators. sedlac.econo.unlp.edu.ar/eng/methodology_faqs.php
SEDLAC itself confirms that the national method (based on consumption)used in Jamaica is the best method. In addition Jamaica is using data which was derived in 2010. The SEDLAC income data in the IMF report is from 2002. The idea that 43.3 of Jamaicans make user 2.50 usd a day is simply ridiculous.

Perhaps one day we can meet face to face and have a more productive chat

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tenman

The only way to solve yoru self-conceit Part 2

#33 King Court » 2013-12-12 21:52

Also, a true review of Jamaica purchasing power parity can be viewed below (Source IMF)

http://www.quandl.com/IMF-International-Monetary-Fund/PPPSH_343-Jamaica-Gross-domestic-product-based-on-purchasing-power-parity-PPP-share-of-world-total-Percent

Anyway, I do not have anymore time with you alias 'Tenman' continue educating yourself, it's the only way to solve ypour self-conceit!


 
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King Court

The only way to solve yoru self-conceit Part 1

#32 King Court » 2013-12-12 21:51

Tenman, you seem to be obsessive with your illogical facts, I do not have to visit the SEDAC website to verify my point. All organization quote IMF data, another:Update on th e Jamaican Economy J ake Johnston and Jua n A. Montecino May 2012 crytsalizes my point: " Although economic growth returned in 2011, a lack of public investment coupled with pro-cyclical macroeconomic policies implemented under the IMF agreement constrained growth. The Jamaican economy grew by 1.5 percent in 2011. This is slow growth by any comparison but is especially weak for a recovery from a recession. The IMF projects the Jamaican economy will not reach its 2007 level until late 2015 while per-capita GDP will remain below its 2007 level in 2017. Accordingly,
poverty and unemployment continue to be elevated.... And this historical trend is one of very low growth for a developing country – just 1.8 percent annually. The current projected growth path thus entails a persistent waste of economic potential and therefore must be regarded as
a long-term policy failure."
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King Court

@tenman or who ever

#31 tenman » 2013-12-12 17:49

@tenman, thanks. Regarding JFII, I have no idea. I too miss his comments

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tenman

much thanks

#30 @tenman » 2013-12-12 13:30

tenman love your perseverance. Thanks for the information. Keep slaying those dragons. do you know the whereabouts of JFII?
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@tenman

King Court- one last thing ( hopefully)

#29 tenman » 2013-12-11 20:36

King Cour - Defense for the consumption method can be found in a study done by University of Chicago in 2012 which concluded that the consumption based poverty measure used by PIOJ is best (see news.uchicago.edu/article/2012/08/17/new-study-finds-consumption-measures-poverty-better-income)

Quote:
The report found that the official poverty rate and the Census Bureau’s new Supplemental Poverty Measure—both of which are income-based—do not gauge the extent of poverty as well as a method based on real purchasing ability. Bruce D. Meyer, the McCormick Foundation Professor at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy, co-authored the study with James X. Sullivan of the University of Notre Dame.
Correctly calculating deprivation helps identify the most disadvantaged individuals and track changes over time. Meyer and Sullivan were surprised to find remarkably little research on the accuracy of the current poverty indicators. Given the measures’ importance, the authors decided to investigate how well the different poverty measures work by looking at 25 different characteristics of individuals, from car ownership and house size to education level and appliance ownership. The goal is to **s more of the advantages that individuals have, rather than their income alone.
The Pov. Cent. at the University of Michigan also agrees: http://www.npc.umich.edu/publications/working_papers/?publication_id=100&
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tenman

King Court

#28 tenman » 2013-12-11 19:28

King Court- if you took the time to go to the SEDAC website you will see that the most recent data they have for JA is 2002. The World Economic and Financial Surveys,Regiona l Economic Outlook, Western Hemisphere Shifting Winds, New Policy Challenges report states clearly (below the table on page 71) that it used the SEDAC data. There is a table on page 3 of the report/note entitled "TECHNICAL NOTE ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES TO THE MEASUREMENT OF POVERTY IN JAMAICA: COMPARING THE ESTIMATES OF THE PLANNING INSTITUTE OF JAMAICA AND THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND" www.pioj.gov.jm/Portals/0/Economic_Sector/Alternative%20approaches%20to%20the%20measurement%20of%20Poverty%20in%20Jamaica.pdf which spells out the difference in a manner that should be easy fora great mind like you claim you have to decipher. Perhaps unlike you, I enjoyed the discussion.
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King Court

#27 tenman » 2013-12-11 19:20

Problems with the IMF-SEDAC methodology (other than it using poverty data from 2002)
Quote:
4. The use of income (IMF SEDAC) rather than consumption data has long been critiqued as being inferior and fraught with problems such as non-reporting, under-reporting, missing and zero values and unreliable income. The case of zero values is particularly relevant to Jamaica. In addition to this, the use of the 2005 PPP-adjusted standard of US$2.50 has been critiqued as being simplistic as it does not allow for (a) regional
variations in price and localized consumption patterns, and (b) variations in
expenditure requirements based on sex and age - individuals of differing sex and age may require differing caloric needs, and hence different expenditures.

5. To account for, among other things, spatial comparability, survey reporting errors and age-sex biases, the Planning Institute of Jamaica has employed the use of consumption-based, regional per adult equivalent poverty lines. The use of these lines alleviates the problems associated with using income data and addresses the issues of regional variations in price and varying expenditure needs based on sex and
age by using regional per adult equivalent poverty lines.
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King Court

#26 tenman » 2013-12-11 19:10

King Court, ignoring your insults the answer lies in: www.pioj.gov.jm/Portals/0/Economic_Sector/Alternative%20approaches%20to%20the%20measurement%20of%20Poverty%20in%20Jamaica.pdf. They state: Quote:
The IMF estimate is derived from the Socio-Economic Database for Latin America
and the Caribbean (SEDLAC), which relies on an income-based methodology to estimate poverty using a 2005 Purchasing Power Parity (PPP)-adjusted per capita reference poverty line of US$2.50 a day. The source of income data is the annual Jamaica Labour Force Survey (JLFS). The most recent figure reported is for the year
2002.
while
Quote:
The methodologies used by the Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to estimate poverty are patently different: The two institutions are using two different approaches for estimating poverty, using two different poverty lines in two different time periods, using two different sources of data and hence the rates produced are not comparable. The Planning institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) uses a consumption-based method to estimate poverty. 1 The poverty
lines used to determine the prevalence of poverty are per adult equivalent regional poverty lines. The source of consumption data is the annual Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions household expenditure survey. The most recent figure reported is for the
year 2010.
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tenman

There are distict difference between IMF and WB

#25 King Court » 2013-12-11 15:28

You keep quoting the World Bank Report, but exclude the IMF Report, there are distinct difference between the two, so I suggest you also get the IMF Report too. I find you to be very conceited to trhe facts of logic reasoning, denying the IMF Report significance. However , let me share the difference beytween the IMF and the World bank with you:

"The fundamental difference is this: the Bank is primarily a development institution; the IMF is a cooperative institution that seeks to maintain an orderly system of payments and receipts between nations."

Who would have more knowledge as to country's economic data? The IMF!
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King Court

King Court

#24 tenman » 2013-12-11 09:50

King Court, decided to take your advice regarding contacting the world bank ( a report gives one figure-43.3% while their official figure using the more stricter national standards shows a completely different picture). I have also sent an email to SEDLAC,'s researcher in Jamaica, Carolina Lopez. Though I suspect you really don't care about their response, I will endeavor to share it with you

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tenman

side work is very important

#23 tenman » 2013-12-11 01:22

King Court- you were the one who told me to look at the Gleaner report.
Quote:
Jamaica has the second-highest unemployment rate at roughly 11.8 per cent, and fourth-highest poverty rate at 43.1 per cent compared with 23 regional neighbors, according to the report,
You can only compare it to 4 of its 12 Caribbean neighbors because for all of the others listed by the report there is no data (poverty, GINI, and in many instances Unemployment). Of countries in CARICOM, looking at South America,there is no data (poverty, GINI) for Guyana.

Again the same world bank in regards to poverty in other reports for the same year (2010) shows JA at 17.6% (national standards of 110099.56 
JA a year or 2.87 USD a day as of 2009 see http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20121209/news/news93.html)
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tenman

Too difficult to comphrend

#22 King Court » 2013-12-10 22:13

Tenman, do you expect the IMF Report to be dated 2011 for 2011, the precdeding year information is always used i.e. 2010. Therefore, as I stated the IMF Report I alluded was 2011, since 2011 would be reflective of 2010 economic data, and 2009 for 2008. Apparently, its too diffucult for you to comphrend....

You are not telling me anything new, I have all the reports, so I do not need to be lectured by you!
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King Court

King Court - know what your data

#21 tenman » 2013-12-10 17:36

King Court again the report that Gleaner based its article on can be found at www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/reo/2011/whd/eng/pdf/wreo1011.pdf. World Economic and Financial Surveys,Regional Economic Outlook, Western Hemisphere Shifting Winds, New Policy Challenges. It has a date of Oct 2011. Simply take a look at the table on page 71 of the said report. The report itself claims its using poverty data for 2010.

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tenman

Dessalines

#20 tenman » 2013-12-10 16:10

Dessalines, not sure what school you attended, but in general if you miss the test, the grade tends to be 0 (especially if its the norm). Even the committee set up by the government to look at our tax system lamented the unavailability of critical data. You really think anyone would put in place a policy where persons benefit from being derelict? Only in your world.

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tenman

Read the damn story

#19 King Court » 2013-12-10 15:35

Tenman, you need to do your homework, you are holding on to a futile point, the report I alluded to was penned in 2011, not in 2010! You are doubtful of the IMF Report, probably you failed to understand the IMF Report: "The IMF report defined poverty as the share of population earning less than US$2.50 per day which translates to 1.1 million Jamaicans living in poverty. Equally concerning is Jamaica's unequal distribution of income, ranked as the second-worst among the 23 listed regional countries in the report. Jamaica scored 59.9 on the Gini coefficient; only Suriname scored higher at 61.6"

These are documented facts, so I suggest you argue your case with the IMF, since you failed to understand the criteria used to analyse poverty, and income inequality! Read the damn story....
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King Court

@ Tenman

#18 Dessalines » 2013-12-10 12:43

Quote:
Dessalines what you and the Gleaner have done is akin to comparing Jamaica who took a test to the majority who did not take the test (the report showed no data for 8 of the 12 nations), and then rating JA as the worse or close to that in the region. Its not rational to give a mark of success to persons who missed a test, they more tend to get a failing mark. In addition the 2012 poverty data from the same World Bank showing JA at 17% should put questions signs on the 43% the report alleges for 2010.
My point exactly. Antigua did not take the test but was scored lower than Somalia. You had no problem with that when it made the UPP look bad.
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Dessalines

Dessalines - your question noted in 2013-12-10 08:38

#17 tenman » 2013-12-10 10:26

Quote:
The substantive point of my post was that Jamaica does not have it's priorities in order - trade deficit with T&T = no action, return undesirables =foreign minister summit. Drain our economy of billions of US dollars and we do nothing,
I have always heard that we are not a reading public. Dessalines Ron Sanders answered your question:
Quote:
But, it is as well to note here that while for the three years 2010-2012, Jamaica had a balance of trade deficit with Trinidad and Tobago of US$2.3 billion, more than 80% of Jamaica’s imports was for mineral fuels, lubricants and related materials that the country would have had to import anyway – and probably at a higher price had it chosen to do so from other places.
Dess last time I checked JA has no oil field and has stated a commitment to pursue alternative energy. Any fair minded person would know it can't happen overnight. Their government has set a goal of 20% alternatiuve energy use by 2030 (see http://www.fierceenergy.com/story/jamaica-sets-path-renewable-future/2013-11-12) Dessalines what is Antigua doing on this issue?
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tenman

Dessalines

#16 tenman » 2013-12-10 10:15

Dessalines what you and the Gleaner have done is akin to comparing Jamaica who took a test to the majority who did not take the test (the report showed no data for 8 of the 12 nations), and then rating JA as the worse or close to that in the region. Its not rational to give a mark of success to persons who missed a test, they more tend to get a failing mark. In addition the 2012 poverty data from the same World Bank showing JA at 17% should put questions signs on the 43% the report alleges for 2010.

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@ Tenman be consistent if you can't be honest

#15 Dessalines » 2013-12-10 09:07

EuroQuote:
Strangely this is the same data the table claims it used to get 43% for 2010. After considering all I have shown, do you consider the gleaner analysis comparing JA to the region fair (with so much missing data)?
When Euromoney magazine reported that Somalia was a safer place to invest then Antigua (with missing or no data) in 2011 you accepted the report's validity without question - the missing data was of no import then as long as the UPP looked bad. However when it comes to your idol Jamaica, we need to factor in missing data. I'll post the link so the readers can follow your two sided and hypocritical logic, one for Antigua and another for Jamaica.

www.Caribarena.com/antigua/news/economy/97700-antigua-bombs-in-listing-of-safest-places-for-business.html#axzz2n4oQpoew
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Dessalines

@ Tenman

#14 Dessalines » 2013-12-10 08:38

The substantive point of my post was that Jamaica does not have it's priorities in order - trade deficit with T&T = no action, return undesirables =foreign minister summit. Drain our economy of billions of US dollars and we do nothing, however never ever deport any of our citizens or we'll go medieval on your proverbial ass!!!

So please speak to the gist of the post and not to my figurative observations. I do have access to the world bank, IMF and CIA factbook info and don't need any lectures from anyone on the data.
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Dessalines

King Court - do your homework

#13 tenman » 2013-12-09 22:20

King Court, I browsed the document used by the gleaner. The poverty data in the table on page http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/reo/2011/whd/eng/pdf/wreo1011.pdf[ 71 is interesting. It shows poverty rates in 2010:Jamaica 43%;Haiti 78.8%. Strangely there is no poverty or Gini data for 8 of the 12 countries in the region (including ours). The only countries in the region with data (GINI and poverty) are Bahamas, DR, Jamaica and Haiti. Strangely the table also has no poverty data for the US & Canada. I also used the world bank data for poverty in JA and its states 17.6% as the poverty rate there for 2012 (see data.worldbank.org/indicator/SI.POV.NAHC/countries/JM?display=graph). Strangely this is the same data the table claims it used to get 43% for 2010. After considering all I have shown, do you consider the gleaner analysis comparing JA to the region fair (with so much missing data)?
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tenman

more stats

#12 tenman » 2013-12-09 18:21

Transparency International:
Trinidad Rank 83 / 177
Jamaica Rank 83/177
Haiti: 163/177
Antigua & Barbuda Not rated due to lack of data

Literacy Rate:
Jamaica 86.4% (free up to secondary education implemented in 2010 will help bring this into the 90 percentile- stat from 2009)
Haiti 48.7%
Trinidad 98.7%
A&B 99%
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tenman

Poverty, unemployment and inequality in Jamaica

#11 King Court » 2013-12-09 17:30

Tenman, I suggest you refer to an article penned in the Gleaner on October 9, 2011 'Poverty, income inequality on the rise in Jamaica - Report' :

"Poverty, unemployment and inequality in Jamaica rank among the worst in the Americas despite the progress made by the debt-exchange programme, according to an International Monetary Fund (IMF) report published this month. "
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King Court

Dessalines know the facts

#10 tenman » 2013-12-09 14:32

Quote:
Dessalines » 2013-12-09 09:52: ..No wonder Jamaica is neck and neck with Haiti in being the poorest in the Caribbean.
Haiti :
Per capita $1,300 (2012 est.)
Unemployment: 40.6% (2010 est.)
population below poverty line: 80% (2003 est.)


Jamaica:
Per Capita income: $9,300 (2012 est.)
unemployment: 14.3% (2012 est.)
Poverty Percentage 17.6%

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tenman

@ Saunders

#9 Dessalines » 2013-12-09 09:52

Why should AJ Nicholson be lauded for this initiative. The Jamaican govt. sat on a US billion dollar deficit with Trinidad for decades and no one thought of calling a meeting with Trinidad. However send home any Jamaican undesirables and they spring into action.
No wonder Jamaica is neck and neck with Haiti in being the poorest in the Caribbean.
Ironic since it was Jamaica that broke up the Federation and now all they seem to do is beg the smaller islands they rejected to take in their economic migrants.
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Dessalines

@ King Court

#8 Just saying » 2013-12-09 04:05

Dr Dr BS is living a nightmare.

He just may not get up after March 2014
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Just saying

You are part of the problem

#7 King Court » 2013-12-09 00:03

Dr Dr Bs what is the theme of your argument? Obviously your focus is not about migration but politicking for the return of ALPs age-old economic plunder.

Your exclusion of IHI, Lester-Tony land swindle, Rappaport and Wexelman payoffs, the shakedown of hundred of businesses for extortion money, the billions in offshore accounts are all excused!

So, is it okay to re-elect Asot 'Penguin' Michael, and Lester Bird, two known criminals, and thieves to plunder the economy again? You are part of the problem, if the solution proffered is to "... send us ABLP quick quick quick."
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King Court

TREAT THE PEOPLE OF HAITI WITH DIGNITY!

#6 King Court » 2013-12-08 23:44

The treatment of CARICOM nationals goes beyond the critique of Ron Sanders dignified argument of "..mankind's common humanity" Yet, CARICOM society treats the people of Haiti in the most contemptible and abusive manner. Up to know the issue continues, from Dominican Republic to Jamaica. Is Haiti not a part of CARICOM?

One particular issue involved a few players of Haiti Under-17 football team diagnosed with malaria, and the mal-treatment that followed during the early stages of the CONCACAF championship in Montego Bay, Jamaica, February 2011. There was growing condemnation of Jamaica, a few called for a boycott, since Haiti's football team were treated as refuges, also Haiti's football coach was "...allegedly handcuffed and forcefully removed from the hotel by representatives from the Ministry of Health..." These incidents resulted in protestors in Haiti desecrating the Jamaican flag!

What does this say about CARICOM and the migration issue? There is strong evidence of discrimination and serious acrimony emanating from the Bahamas, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic. Resolve the Haitian crisis now, waive Visa requirements for our liberators, and stop treating them as refugees. Time to treat the people of Haiti wit dignity!
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King Court

Keep It Simple Stupid

#5 Observer... » 2013-12-08 19:31

Well Sir Ronald. intellectually speaking you may have the right **sment of the issue and the time we are in. But in your previous article I already voiced that in my humble opinion the Caribbean people are simply not ready for free movement of people. Only when it comes to watch a cricket match. There is so much envy and strive between the people of the Islands. It will take much education and perhaps more inter Islands games to foster community spirit. Cricket alone cannot do it. As you see the politician are mainly the culprit in dividing the people. Mr. Garry Griffith's statements are well in place for his so called base.
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Observer...

@Tomb Stone and Ron

#4 Antiguan » 2013-12-08 11:46

Good article Ron but nothing much has changed in terms of unity since the split up of the attempted Federation. Too many differences and lack of equal resources amongst us for any semblance of unification. I am still scratching my head wondering why we have so much oil in Trinidad a CARICOM nation but have to settle with PetroCaribe for all these loan shark bribes. If we cannot trade fairly within CARICOM what make you think freedom of movements will be sustained. It appears Trinidad got its oil and they do not really need CARICOM at the moment.
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Antiguan

Tribalism 2

#3 Dr Dr BS » 2013-12-08 11:30

Well we all know about the fences scandal with the Asian people making millions for not doing a thing but erecting some unfinished walls, We know about the WPP and the death of APUA and the high bills that followed. We know about the purchase of 100s of millions of $ in old buildings and unfinished buildings. We know about the hospital.

Lord help us, send us ABLP quick quick quick.

Election will come and the UPP will go.
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Dr Dr BS

Tribalism

#2 Dr Dr BS » 2013-12-08 11:26

@Tomb Stone, it's called tribalism and Baldwin Spencer and Errol Cort are at the forefront of pushing it in Antigua to the point where Baldwin in his rude, uneducated, illiterate self which has no decorum could talk about dividing Antiguans into sheep and goat. IS this man real? IS he really the prime minister who has been elected twice to the country's highest office?

Is that the best UPP could come up with, there is no one else in that party who is able to run the party? Where are all the educated persons in that party who actually have some real corporate experience?
OH I got it, Jackie called the elderly ragtags and send them home from their jobs, Errol Cort called them ungrateful civil servants and killed them with taxes, Harold Lovell lied to them over and over, give them IMF after all the years of hard work and sweat to build themselves, they and their children are now on the sides of the road begging, Social Security is destroyed so they cannot get their pension...Wilmouth Daniel gave them 1 billion $ of nothing for roads.
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Dr Dr BS

Remember Federation

#1 Tomb Stone » 2013-12-08 08:54

Just like in Africa, we doomed from a complex and would never unite.
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Tomb Stone

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Sir Ronald Sanders

Sir Ronald Sanders is a business executive and former Caribbean diplomat who publishes widely on Small States in the global community.

 

 

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