WRONG_WOEID WRONG_WOEID

Black Mindedness The Etiology of Our Demise

African-enslavementThe Conditioned Culture of Mindlessness- In anthropology, culture is operationally defined as the learned, shared, and transmitted values, beliefs, and norms, incorporated by a “group” to sustain and perpetuate itself.

At its core, culture is concerned with group preservation; it transcends language, gastronomy, music, dance and art, and is the unique key to understanding the dysfunctions created by the peculiar socialization of African slave descendents.

After decades of investigating the distinctiveness of “black culture,” it is my enduring contention that wherever in the world you scientifically observe “black people” (descendants of African chattel slaves) and black communities, you find the predominant behavioral proclivities to be rooted in the “artificial culture” inculcated during the slavery epoch and transmitted down the generations. Accordingly, it would not be inaccurate to deduce that the self-destructive, self-loathing, self-sabotaging behaviors typically demonstrated by black people everywhere in the world, is inextricably linked to the conditioning processes used by slave owners to systematically reconstruct the innate  psyche of our enslaved ancestors during the slavery era.


During the holocaust of African enslavement, unnatural social and psychological modalities (traits of “mental slavery”) were learned, assimilated and transmitted through generations of chattel slaves to generations of modern “wage slaves,” who have been afforded the amusing privileges of autonomy, higher education and social equality to decipher their “conditioned mindlessness” (loss of their natural mind).

Despite emancipation proclamations, anti-slavery laws and a seat at the master’s table, black people in every corner of the globe are entrapped in a mindset which keeps them as enslaved today as they were 300 years ago. As a black forensic psychologist (forensic psychology is the conjunction of law and psychology), I find that reality more than a little unnerving, and in this article, I hope to provide some insights into why blacks remain “enslaved” today, hundreds of years after our ancestors received their “free papers”.

Introduction to the Willie Lynch Syndrome

The following speech was delivered by Willie Lynch on the bank of the James River in the colony of Virginia, USA in 1712. Willie Lynch was a British slave owner in the West Indies, who was invited to the colony of Virginia, USA in 1712 to teach his methods to slave owners. The term “lynching” is derived from his last name.


“Greetings,
Gentlemen, I greet you here on the bank of the James River in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twelve. First, I shall thank you, the gentlemen of the Colony of Virginia, for bringing me here. I am here to help you solve some of your problems with slaves. Your invitation reached me on my modest plantation in the West Indies, where I have experimented with some of the newest, and still the oldest, methods for control of slaves. Ancient Rome would envy us if my program is implemented.

As our boat sailed south on the James River, named for our illustrious King, whose version of the Bible we cherish, I saw enough to know that your problem is not unique. While Rome used cords of wood as crosses for standing human bodies along its highways in great numbers, you are here using the tree and the rope on occasions.

I caught the whiff of a dead slave hanging from a tree, a couple miles back. You are not only losing valuable stock by hangings, you are having uprisings, and slaves are running away, your crops are sometimes left in the fields too long for maximum profit, you suffer occasional fires, and your animals are killed.

Gentlemen, you know what your problems are; I do not need to elaborate. I am not here to enumerate your problems; I am here to introduce you to a method of solving them. In my bag here, I have a full proof method for controlling your black slaves. I guarantee every one of you that, if installed correctly, it will control the slaves for at least 300 hundreds years.


My method is simple. Any member of your family or your overseer can use it. I have outlined a number of differences among the slaves; and I take these differences and make them bigger. I use fear, distrust and envy for control purposes. These methods have worked on my modest plantation in the West Indies and it will work throughout the South.

Take this simple little list of differences and think about them. On top of my list is “age,” but it’s there only because it starts with an “a.” The second is “color” or shade. There is intelligence, size, sex, sizes of plantations, status on plantations, attitude of owners, whether the slaves live in the valley, on a hill, East, West, North, South, have fine hair, course hair, or is tall or short.

Now that you have a list of differences, I shall give you an outline of action, but before that, I shall assure you that distrust is stronger than trust and envy stronger than adulation, respect or admiration. The Black slaves after receiving this indoctrination shall carry on and will become self-refueling and self-generating for hundreds of years, maybe thousands.

Don’t forget, you must pitch the old black male vs. the young black male, and the young black male against the old black male. You must use the dark skin slaves vs. the light skin slaves, and the light skin slaves vs. the dark skin slaves. You must use the female vs. the male, and the male vs. the female. You must also have white servants and overseers distrust all Blacks. But it is necessary that your slaves trust and depend on us. They must love, respect and trust only us.

Gentlemen, these kits are your keys to control. Use them. Have your wives and children use them, never miss an opportunity. If used intensely for one year, the slaves themselves will remain perpetually distrustful. Thank you gentlemen.”

The Making of a Slave

Like Willy Lynch, it was the business and preoccupation of many slave owners to study human nature and the mental constructs of the slave-making process, with a view towards practical, sustainable economic results. Indeed, the study of slave-making increased dramatically after emancipation, when sophisticated techniques were perfected by the pioneers of psychiatry and psychology to reinforce white supremacy. The mentally enslaved conditions of the hundreds of millions of blacks who are the posterity of African chattel slaves constitute a living testimony of the astounding proficiency achieved in ensuring the long-term effects of the slave-making process.


In his seminal text, Let’s Make a Slave, Frederick Douglas, a black abolitionist, who was himself a former slave, documented his study of the scientific processes employed by white slave owners to break black Africans captives and make them into slaves. He describes the “breaking” process as employing the same basic principles used in breaking a horse, combined with features of “operant conditioning” to produce a complete reversal of the slaves’ natural mind. The object of the methods employed was to completely distort the minds of the slaves while keeping their bodies fit for production.

After being subjected to the breaking processes, black men and women were psychologically reduced and transformed from their natural state. Slave owners learned that humans would not work as chattel slaves in their natural state.Consequently, scientific methods were employed where the natural human independence, the tendency to seek freedom and the natural capacity to take care of offspring, were systematically stripped away and the natural mind systematically distorted to create a dependency which enabled slave owners to enjoy useful production and a variety of prurient pleasures from their slaves.

Breaking the Female

In her natural state, a female would have a strong psychological dependency on her mate and a protective tendency toward her offspring. Slave owners were instructed to reverse the nature of female slaves by brutally killing, torturing, and bullwhipping male slaves to the point of death, in the presence of the female slaves, in order to destroy her image of the black male, and to leave her feeling lonely and unprotected.

Female slaves were tested regularly to determine their continued willingness to submit completely to the will of the slave master, who would never hesitate to use the bullwhip if female slaves showed any sign of resisting, albeit care was taken not to kill the females and destroy a good investment. Slave masters learned that after they break the female (mother), she will break her offspring to submit to labor in its early years, and when her offspring becomes old enough to work, she will readily deliver her child to the slave masters, because her normal female protective tendencies would have been lost in her breaking process.


Regular ordeals were orchestrated to systematically transform female slaves from their natural state to a psychologically frigid, traumatized state. In this unnatural psychological state, female slaves raised their male and female offspring in unnaturally reversed gender roles.Out of fear for the life of her male offspring, female slaves ensured that their sons became physically strong, but raised them to be mentally weak and dependent, while female offspring were trained to be independent.

As a consequence of the breaking process, female slaves unwittingly socialized their female offspring to become psychologically independent while the males were reduced to being psychologically petrified, dominated, and dependent.

Brutality

The processes used to break slaves were notoriously brutal. One fear tactic widely in use in the conditioning process involved taking one of the most restless male slaves, stripping him of his clothes, then tarring and feathering him in front of the other males, females, and infants. Next, they would tie each of his legs to a different horse, faced in opposite directions, set him on fire and beat both horses until he was torn apart and ablaze in front of the other slaves. The remaining males would then be bullwhipped to the brink of death, in front of the females and the infants, to imprint the fear of the white master in the minds of all the slaves.

Crossbreeding

Frederick Douglass also informs us that the slave owners paid less attention to the original subjects of the breaking process, but concentrated on future generations, which provided evidence of the effectiveness of their methods. There was special and particular focus on female slaves and their offspring, since both are required to be crossbred to produce a variety of skin colors, which determined position in the division of labor (the “brown paper bag test”). Crossbreeding slaves meant that white males would impregnate as many black slaves as possible, and then let their offspring breed with each other to create as many different skin colors as possible. Since skin color determined social status and position in the hierarchy of labor, this method of crossbreeding ensured confusion and disunity among the slaves, based on skin color.

The Role of the Christian Church

This article is far from comprehensive and intended to only touch generally, a few of the key devices used in the slave-making process, but I would be remiss if I did not mention the important role of Christianity and the church in reinforcing white supremacy and  securing the success of the brutal, racist conditioning of black slaves. Black Christians still sing “the rich man [white slave master] in his palace, the poor man at the gate, high and low God made them so and ordered their estate.”

Conclusion

Through the process of continually breaking the slaves, traumatizing and throwing the female slaves into a frigid psychological state, killing the protective male image, and creating submissive dependent male slaves, the safety and security of the slave owners were guaranteed. Everywhere, there is evidence that the cycle created by slave owners has successfully regenerated for more than 500 years and could literally regenerate on its own forever, unless this regenerating “psychological genocide” is reversed by a system of “emancipation education” to restore our natural minds.

 

The Scarlet Pimpernel is the nom de plume of an Antiguan born “knowledge broker” whose intercontinental exploits involve work as a university founder and educator, military strategist, international legal consultant, United States prosecutor, published author, trade advisor in Latin America and international investment counselor.

The inimitable acuity of the “Pimpernel” is sought after by entrepreneurs, investors and governments from Dubai to Brazil. Recent work, created for Latin America, which speaks to the conjunction of technology and education to reduce cost, motivate students and improve testing results will be translated for school systems across the Caribbean. “Employing anonymity to domesticate the ego ...”

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62 Comments In This Article   

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@ countryman

#62 my way of helping » 2011-03-04 09:56

you will never know what undergraduate and graduate/law-school i go to. To negative to know my personal life.
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my way of helping

Comic relief or what?

#61 Countryman » 2011-03-04 00:15

One writer states that the individual with the moniker " "My way of helping stated that he or she is a lawyer, Another states "my way of helping" graduated from an top 10 university. That is impossible. Assuming the Ivys are in the top 8 even though that not the case; that leave the possibility among UC. Berkeley Stanford, MIT, CIT, Duke, Vanderbilt or Emory. Am I mistaken that the school in question is law school and not undergrad?
Now that I have gone out on a limb cut me down. But in the mean time I would really like to know.
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Countryman

@ Professor

#60 Morris » 2011-03-03 10:45

Racism is very much alive in the military. They have infiltrated the military for years to get legitimate weapons and explosives training at taxpayers expense. I remember back in '94 while I was on a Robin Sage (Special Forces qualification/select ion) exercise, that we had to cross an open field to get to our rendezvous point. Now it is not tactical to cross an open field to expose yourself to the enemy, so we decided to skirt it and cut through a property to get to the waiting vehicle. To our surprise, an elderly white male came on the deck with a shotgun and said to get off of his property. We thought that it was an added twist to the exercise, as the whole town (located in western NC) has always played an active role in the exercise. It was not until he got louder, locked a round in the chamber with pump action, and said niggers were not allowed on his property that we knew this was serious. But to make matters worse, I wa** man (front man) on that patrol and would have been the first casualty. So to answer you Professor, I know exactly how you must have felt.
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Morris

@ Tenman

#59 Professor » 2011-03-03 07:46

Very well said!

When I was a US Navy Officer temporarily stationed a Lawre Air force Base in Denver Colorado, I remember witnessing a Klu Klux Klan Rally, a massive parade of racist walking through the streets of an big American city without hoods or fear. I stood there petrified in my dress white uniform wondering why am I fighting for a country of racist people. When I returned to the base that evening my mentor told me that being an Officer in the US Navy meant defending the right of people to hate me.

I wonder if Morris can tell us of the kinds of racism he experienced in the US military.
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Professor

@Professor - education part 2

#58 tenman » 2011-03-03 06:46

(Please note that we have to free ourselves)
Emancipat e yourselves from mental slavery
None but ourselves can free our minds
Have no fear for atomic energy
'Cause none of them can stop the time
How long shall they kill our prophets
While we stand aside and look? Ooh
Some say it's just a part of it
We've got to fullfil the book

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tenman

@Professor - education part 1

#57 tenman » 2011-03-03 06:44

Professor I won't ague with you that we need to adjust the way we educate our children. I happen to believe that part of the reason for many of the current failures has to do with us not teaching enough about Caribbean and African history. I am one who will admit that my ideals about color and beauty were messed up and it was not until I went to the US and took some African studies cl** that I started to recognize the dumb ideas I had pertaining to color. Recall my run ins with a few African American women who upon learning I was from the west Indies stated they know we prefer white women. Professor, we know the short comings of our existing system and if its unwilling to change then its up to parents to add the needed elements. I happen to believe we are better off now than we were fifty years ago. We have more tools and as far as mental slavery goes let me leave you with these words most already know:

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tenman

@ Tenman ... The Miseducation of Black People

#56 Professor » 2011-03-03 06:00

In 1835, the Negro Education Grant was passed by the British Parliament to provide training "for the moral and religious education for the Negro population". The British realized that good religious instruction would keep the newly emancipated blacks contented in their new form of subjugation. Wage slavery required a certain level of education and the slave masters (owners of industry) was more than happy to provide the finance for the education required to advance their profit interest.

Black people took over the education systems in the Caribbean, but the basic purpose of educating black people has not changed, students are still being prepared to go looking for a JOB, as opposed to HOW TO CREATE JOBS.
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Professor

@ Tenman

#55 Jus Sayin » 2011-03-03 05:24

The United States is a terrible example when it comes to the treatment of black people. White supremacy and covert racism is as alive in the US today as was overt racism in nazi Germany. The most mentally enslaved black people in the world were born in the Caribbean. They try as hard as they can to distance themselves from their African roots and heritage. Caribbean people love white people more than white people love themselves. Caribbean leaders are the most corrupt on the planet and the social stratification rivals that of India. Barbados and the Bahamas treat their Caribbean brothers and sisters (immigrants) like dirt. And finally, miseducation of black people is only a success for white supremacy.
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Jus Sayin

@Jus Sayin

#54 tenman » 2011-03-03 02:39

Jus Sayin, no standard of progress can claim that a country where the majority of the population is impoverished and treated unequally that it is a flourishing nation. I am sure that if you asked the average South African if life was better under Apartheid vs now they would choose now. Yes things are not the way many would like but there has been great progress. One can look in the region for countries that have been able to do well and two example I will offer are the Bahamas and Barbados. Using the measure of poverty, Barbados has 8.7% (2004), Bahamas has 9.3% (2003) while the USA 14.3% (2010) and was 12.7% in 2004. I must state that if you looked at only African americans in 2009 the figure was 25.8 percent. Seems to me that these small islands especially, including Antigua, have done a better job in taking care of persons of African decent. Let me also suggest that a child of African decent has a better chance of educational success than one of a similar race who lives in the US. Am I alone in thinking that the majority of black university professors in the US were raised in the Caribbean?

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tenman

#53 Jus Sayin » 2011-03-02 23:52

Under apartheid South Africa was a rich, flourishing nation, they even had nuclear weapons. Now that black people have taken over South Africa the country is on a downward spiral. A lot of time money and effort is spent on making black people blame themselves for their problems. They try to make black people believe that their problems result from lack of unity, lack of education, lack of power and so on, but I have lived long enough and I am wise enough to know that there is an invisable hand in the world that operates to keep black people subjugated.
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Jus Sayin

NOT BY ACCIDENT

#52 Traveller » 2011-03-02 23:40

I challenge all the bloggers here on Caribarena to tell me one country in the world where there are different races and cultures of people living together and black people are at the top. There is only one scientific explanation for that, it is either that (i) black people are inferior, or (ii) black people have been deliberately and systematically held down. I chose to believe the latter.
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Traveller

@ Antiguan Abroad

#51 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 14:35

Antiguan Abroad keep blogging i think you are a good blogger and perhaps they both (authors) used the same words or phrases to describe something. it happen many-times before.
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my way of helping

Willie Lynch

#50 andromeda » 2011-03-02 13:49

I have been following this Willie Lynch thing for years I know the estate Black Lynch and the adjoining estate Lynches. I read the preceeding opinions and can't help thinking that exactly what Willie Lynch propagated is playinging itself out right here before by eyes. Seems like some black people look for reasons to discredit instead of looking for what may well be the possibility of fact. Willie Lynch had estates in Antigua and if he died 22 years after the alleged speech that should help to show that the man may well have visited the US. Oh yeah some people would have a vested interest in trying to prove that the speech was a hoax, and you can always get some black people to prove that, by whatever convoluted means necessary. Obama, Oprah, Mandella are exceptions and there have always been many many exceptions probably a large proportion in the past have been lynched observe that word.
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andromeda

#49 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 12:32

The Devil's Left Hand, I believe I have already provided evidence to Professor to support my position, which was not taken lightly. I posit that it is you who are wrong. But in spite of that, I respect your opinion.

Professor, you are proving yourself to be more and more irrational, and dare I say....hysterical. Yes, I am fully confident in myself and my abilities and I respect others. Not so long ago, I recall you blasting My Way of Helping and casting doubt on his claim that he was a lawyer. Now you say he went to a top tier school and posseses "modern"citation skills. What changed? Did he send you his transcripts? Believe it or not, I simply call it like I see it, without fear or favor, regardless who the "culprit" is. I am not blinded by the credentials or scholarship of others, since I am comfortable in my own skin. So far, none of your recent postings appear to me to be on point......However, if the Scarlet Pimpernel were to offer a reasonable explanation to help settle this debate, perhaps I would be convinced to re-examine my opinions. In the meantime, I advise you to stop trying to denigrate others in an attempt justify your own self importance.

Have a great night!
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Antiguan Abroad

@ Antiguan Abroad PATENTLY FALACIOUS

#48 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 11:48

You posted "The fact that the author specifically used similar arguments, words and phrases, in an almost similar format to the article I earlier referenced by Mr. Farrakhan's publication, without the proper citations, equates to plagiarism, in my view." You a DEAD WRONG because SIMILAR words, phrases and format is insufficient to substantiate your charge, you need SAME words and phrases. Similar format is inconsequential, and you should know that SIMILAR words and phrases are generally used by different writers to describe the concepts extracted from the SAME original source, which in this case is the Frederick Douglass book Let's Make a Slave. Your stubborn lawerly insistence on casting spurious aspersions on the writer is making you look like a bad person as opposed to one that sticks to her guns. Give it up, do the right thing and apologize. All the bloggers are waiting to see you take the high road.
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The Devil's Left Hand

@ Antiguan Abroad

#47 Professor » 2011-03-02 11:21

Whoever you are you are giving bloggers the idea that you are the kind of person that believes that you are "all that" but your arguments are specious at best. (1) Obviously, black people are not the only people suffering from mental slavery, but that does not make it right. Colonialism globalized the slave making methods perfected on African slaves. (2) Take a second to really think about it Antiguan Abroad; considering the prior scholarly writings by the Scarlet Pimpernel that you described as "compelling" and realize that a scholar of that caliber, a person who does not even have the need to take credit for brilliantly written articles, had no need to acredit the final call writing based on the fact that nothing was lifted VERBATIM.

You probably went to school a long time ago like myself, that is why "My way of helping" who just left a top 10 university is also telling you about the modern standards of citing authority.
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Professor

@ Antiguan Abroad let me use another bloggers words to make the point that you just do not seem to get

#46 Professor » 2011-03-02 11:02

A blogger named Antiguan Slave correctly informed you that "the writer cited his original source and that was enough" ... the blogger goes on to explain that "The two articles used the same sources (the Let's Make a Slave book and the Willie Lynch speech) and they both gave credit to their sources." But as a professor, I particularly like the anology where the blogger stated "I look at it like two different writers doing a report on the same book book by Frederick Doughla*s, even though the second writer read the first book report he does not have to cite it. That would not be a requirement in any college in the world unless he takes material from the first report and use it WORD FOR WORD." That is the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Antiguan Abroad it is obvious that you didn't make the law review, maybe you can show us your scholarly writings with appropriate citations.
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Professor

The money made from Sex Slaves is on the rise, it is expected to exceed drugs in a few years

#45 Puta Cara » 2011-03-02 10:50

The second most profitable illegal activity in the world today is sex slavery. Millions of girls each year are sold into slavery by their parents to pay debts or are kidnapped and sold to modern slavers for use in brothels across Europe and Asia. As soon as they are received, these girls are immediately hooked on drugs to keep them enslaved. The profit motive behind all kinds of slavery is very intoxicating so these activities continue unabated
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Puta Cara

@ PFKAR Thank you for the references

#44 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 10:40

I think that the emphasis on Willie Lynch is misguided. The article sought to show that the basic tenets of the Willie Lynch Speech was supported in the book by Frederick Douglass "Let's Make a Slave". Please note that the writer did not use any part of the speech to advance his arguments, all references were made to the book by Frederick Douglass. Even if you controvert the validity of the Willie Lynch Speech, do you also believe that the documentation of slave life by Frederick Douglass is a hoax?
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The Devil's Left Hand

@ Antiguan Abroad

#43 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 10:32

I have not read the other article you are comparing this one too, so I can't affirm or reject your statement about this article but my post about it, was to make aware of how ideas, may or may not be classed as plagiarized. Remember, beliefs are your own and do not need to be cited.

However, for the other part, i do not know and can only take your word and the author's word for it because i have not read what you say may have been plagiarized from.

Keep the good work up and let us support each other, all my love.
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my way of helping

#42 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 10:12

My Way of Helping, You have stated in past postings that you too are a lawyer....I thought my earlier postings were fairly clear and unambiguous. I am referring strictly to the ideas stated in this piece. The fact that the author specifically used similar arguments, words and phrases, in an almost similar format to the article I earlier referenced by Mr. Farrakhan's publication, without the proper citations, equates to plagiarism, in my view. I'm not even interested in debating all this other nonsense about black people the world over being in mental slavery....I'm quite confident that I am not. As i stated to Tenman earlier...if they are, they are not alone. And I don't think it is due to slavery - otherwise, others who were never slaves would not suffer a similar affliction. While I have nothing against The Scarlet Pimpernel (I don't even know who he/she is), I was surprised that his piece so closely mimicked the earlier work....and I'm not referring to Frederick Douglas, which was a cited work from the original article, which Pimpernel also used. I think he should have known better, particularly in light of the biography which follows his nom de plume.
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Antiguan Abroad

Economics determined the abolition of slavery

#41 Antiguan Slave » 2011-03-02 09:56

Slavery was abolished when the slave owners were finally convinced by the economists of the day that it was cheaper to free the slaves and pay them next to nothing than to keep them as slaves and have to provide them with food, clothing, medicine, and accommodate old people and young children etc. Even Adam Smith shared this view.

The families that got rotten rich off slavery decided that they would enslave the whole world for personal gain. It was decided that "chattel slavery" would be replaced by "wage slavery" which is still the order of the day. Colonialism assisted the transition and expanded slavery throughout every continent and country on the globe.
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Antiguan Slave

@ Devil's left hand

#40 PFKAR » 2011-03-02 09:39

Ask, and you shall receive. No claims as to the reputation of the historians in question.

William Jelani Cobb Ph.D., Associate Professor of history at Spelman College
http://web.archive.org/web/20070814182601/http://www.jelanicobb.com/portfolio/willie_lynch_is_dead.html 
Manu Ampim (referenced by Morris), profile here:
http://www.manuampim.com/africana_profile.htm

Thoughts on The Willie Lynch speech here:
http://www.manuampim.com/lynch_hoax1.html

Don't read into my posts too much. I am not refuting the article's claims, though they are certainly debatable; just pointing out that a stronger argument can be grounded in established fact.

My reference to the Willie Lynch "letter" refers to the speech's manifestation in the 20th century. It is often referred to as the "Willie Lynch letter"
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PFKAR

@ Tenman

#39 Morris » 2011-03-02 09:07

I remember discussing this issue at length for about two straight days when I attended the Equal Opportunity Advisor (EOA) school, and to our surprise many came to the conclusion that this was more of a hoax than truth, that is why I take the position I have.
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Morris

@ Tenman

#38 Morris » 2011-03-02 08:52

There is no public historical record other that the speech (letter) and your source (book) that I am aware of that proves your point. I believe that this was used to stimulate a certain consciousness in "Black America." But like they say in the X Files series, "the truth is still out there."
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Morris

@ Antiguan Abroad

#37 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 08:21

I must say i like your bloggs and really do would like you to keep blogging but you perhaps over looked one thing because i know you know this but for the others who may not know this. Only license attorney can give legal advice, however, anyone can inform you on what the law states, where to look in the law for particular issues and what remedy is available for particular issues.

Legal advice and simply informing someone are close, so courts, require so much to prove someone was acting like a lawyer( giving legal advice) from just simply sharing information. Most courts will not even take the case, unless the person openly say, "I am a lawyer and perhaps have things misrepresenting them self (business cards etcetera)".

So, informing someone about the law and giving legal advice are tremendously SIMILAR. one is punishable by law if you are not licensed and one is not.
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my way of helping

@ Antiguan Abroad

#36 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 08:14

Not trying to simply but in your debate with others but PROFESSOR has a point, using word for word requires citation, however, ideas are much different, you cite idea's if you know that it came from a person and it is popular (everyone knows that this person is the originator of the idea). However, other ideas, that are not popular and you thought about it and you did not know (because it is not popular) that someone else came up with it does not require citations, because in fact it is your idea and had no knowledge someone else concluded the samething.

I had many ideas, research and theories before a few people (example, the Alphonse Breau report) and I also have concluded particular ideas not knowing people have already, would you consider this plagiarism?
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my way of helping

@ PFKAR Willie Lynch gave a SPEECH it was not a LETTER

#35 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 07:52

Please provide the sources, i.e. the names of the 2 black historians and what they said. Whenever the people on this blog are asked to provide proof of what they are saying they run and hide. I appreciate your responses, but I want to encourage you to get off the periphery and let us know what you really think about the substantive meat of this article.

For example, the writer never said that blacks were the only persons afflicted with mental slavery, but one blogger stated, "I reject the proposition that blacks around "the globe" are the sole victims of this human condition.

Does Oprah Winfrey's money and fame or Barack Obama's position make him less of a slave?
Do you know why Nelson Mandela was sent to prison?
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The Devil's Left Hand

@morris

#34 tenman » 2011-03-02 07:45

Morris also keep in mind the description given of Lynch: "This speech was delivered by Willie Lynch on the bank of the James River in the colony of Virginia in 1712. Lynch was a British slave owner in the West Indies. He was invited to the colony of Virginia in 1712 to teach his methods to slave owners there. The term "lynching" is derived "

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@Morris

#33 tenman » 2011-03-02 07:39

Morris if you get the chance please google the book and you will find the excerpts which explain why Prof. Manu Ampim is wrong. It goes into detail showing when Lynch was married, and when he went to Virginia. It speaks of the lynch plantation and other proof of his existence. As another poster (PFKAR) stated there is no direct proof that he made the statement above but only indications that since someone with the same name clearly existed, during the time period in question, he could have made that speech.



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Tenman and Antiguan Abroad

#32 Antiguan Slave » 2011-03-02 07:19

I believe the plagarism thing is a bit overstated by Antiguan Abroad. I think that Professor is right in saying that the writer cited his original source and that was enough. The two articles used the same sources (the Let's Make a Slave book and the Willie Lynch speech) and they both gave credit to their sources. I just read the other article that they say the writer copied and I feel that this article is so much better. I look at it like two different writers doing a report on the same book book by Frederick Doughlass, even though the second writer read the first book report he does not have to cite it. That would not be a requirement in any college in the world unless he takes material from the first report and use it WORD FOR WORD.
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Antiguan Slave

@ Devil's left hand

#31 PFKAR » 2011-03-02 07:09

Err... Just because you don't like what a historian has to say, doesn't mean that they are "white racists".

By the way, both of the historians referenced in this thread as refuting the authenticity of the Lynch letter are black.
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PFKAR

@ Tenman

#30 Morris » 2011-03-02 07:02

The link I provided you does not dispute anyone in Antigua by that name during that time, it clearly states that there was no one in America by that name and around that time who could have delivered such a speech.
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Morris

#29 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 06:56

Tenman, I've said before that I believe that you are one of the more thoughtful commentators on this site...and I repeat it.

Professor's rants about IP addresses do not cause me the least amount of "fear". I dismiss his/her rants as ignorance - nothing more. If my opinions would give rise to a defamation suit by anyone, I would be happy to voluntarily release my identity and mount all appropriate defenses....and counter-suits if required.

By the way, Professor...as an FYI...only licensed attorneys are allowed to provide "legal advice".
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Antiguan Abroad

I have some Q's and give me some A's?

#28 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 06:54

we bring down our own, when was the last time you see a black person supporting another black person (with out benefits?, the blacks (most) voted for Obama because they would feel like they achieve too.
Have you been reading Caribarena's blogs?
Have you seen the Government and who they employ?
Have you seen what we do if people speak the truth (look at how this author is treated for speaking this truth)?
Did you see how one is treated for asking to stating things must be given because of merit?
Do you see how innocent people are accused for taking and otherwise?
You see all these mostly in blacks and there are more but i do not have the space to write it and do not reply and say white's or Asian. We (blacks) are just horrible.
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my way of helping

@PFKAR & Fed Up (brilliant observation)

#27 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 06:48

Do you agree that there is sych a thing as "White Supremacy" and that it still exists? Why do you feel compelled to look to white racist historians to validate what you know to be true?

The blacks in Africa who were never captured and transplanted into servitude in the new world are equally aflicted with mental slavery as a consequence of the global systems and institutions of white supremacy and colonialism.

As stated in the article, slave making methods were perfected after slavery, during the colonial period. Black people graduated from chattel slavery to wage slavery and our educational and religious institutions did an excellent job on keepin us enslaved.
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The Devil's Left Hand

@Antiguan Abroad - media at work

#26 tenman » 2011-03-02 06:45

@Antiguan Abroad on working on my response to your blog I came across excerpts to a book Unthinking Eurocentrism: multiculturalism and the media By Ella Shohat, Robert Stam which quotes a pamphlet as stating:
"How to make an Indian movie. Buy 40 indians. Totally humiliate and degrade an entire Indian
nation. Make sure all Indians are savage, cruel and ignorant. Import a Greek to be an Indian princess. Introduce a white man to become an "Indian" here. Make the white man compassionate, brave and understanding..
"

G oes to show that the control did not stop when slavery ended.

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tenman

@ pimpernelly; What you say is true

#25 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 06:38

I must say I agree, however, others may not, it is deep. I have been living in Antigua for years and left to go to school in America. I lived in many places (states, cities) in America and I must say the blacks treated me so horrible, they think, a new person (just because you are new) is out for no good and is so skeptical of everything. Why did the white people treated me so well, come talk to me, ask about my country and also bought me a car (graduation present) but the blacks up to now are so rude, curse each other out (who has the best car, curtains, who getting the biggest barrel at Christmas, whose house just got painted.

Pimpernel, I agree and i am a deep thinker to notice this (one of these or all) in Black people everywhere. I ran away from Antigua because 0f this mainly, do you know all my years living with with people, i have never seen an argument, i have never been left out or treated with skepticism because i am new, they trust me allowed me to see where their safe are with lot of money and trusted me.
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my way of helping

@Professor

#24 tenman » 2011-03-02 06:32

Professor I know if I were to write a paper where I took ideas from a newspaper, journal, book etc and not state that, I would be accused of plagiarism. It is not enough to simply paraphrase. Why do you need to do the ip address fear thing?

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tenman

#23 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 06:28

Professor, I stand by my earlier comments. And again, I find your academic standards with respect to the topic at hand highly suspect. Is your school accredited, or is it an online university?....(Just curious...no disrespect meant). Regardless, plagiarism can be found NOT to be present even if sections of different texts are in fact VERBATIM (as you keep harping on). In other words, one can produce words that exactly mirror another author, but those thoughts must have been independently arrived at. The issue is not the exact replication of only words, but of ideas and concepts as well, without proper citation. I think this author is in clear violation of these principles. I invite you to open the following link and review the article on plagiarism, published by a respected and accredited US law school: http://www.albanylaw.edu/sub.php?navigation_id=583
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Antiguan Abroad

The Eye Cannot See Itself

#22 Professor » 2011-03-02 06:25

I have compared the two writings again and I feel compelled to defend the writer because I understand the issue even better now. Contrary to one blogger (Antiguan Abroad), the author does in fact attribute the original source, which is Frederick Douglass' book "Lets Make a Slave" and the Willie Lynch Speech is properly presented in quotations.

The Final call article is an presentation of the Willie Lynch Speech and restatement of ideas presented in the book. The Scarlet Pimpernel attributes the same book as the original source, includes the Willie Lynch Speech and presents the same ideas in a more global context to show the extent to which the methods described in the book and the speech were effective.

I find this article to be another brilliant piece by the Scarlet Pimpernel. Keep educating us.
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Professor

@morris - check my reference because it directly attacks yours

#21 tenman » 2011-03-02 06:20

Morris the link your provided states: "The only known “William Lynch” who could have authorized a 1712 speech in Virginia was born 30 years after the alleged speech was given. The only known “William Lynch” lived from 1742-1820 and was from Pittsylvania, Virginia. It is obvious that “William Lynch” could not have authored a document 30 years before he was born! This “William Lynch” never owned a plantation in the West Indies, and he did not own a slave plantation in Virginia. "

However the earlier reference I provided, by Rahim Muhammad, disputes Prof. Manu Ampim because it showed that William Lynch did exist and died in Antigua Aug 1734 (22 years after the alleged Speech in Virginia) and also owned slaves.

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Antiguan Abroad

#20 tenman » 2011-03-02 05:56

Antiguan Abroad I would prefer not to examine China because I don't consider it a democracy. However India is a good example. Antiguan Abroad from my experiences with Indians I get the impression that they have a problem with anything dark and love anything white. Though this existed before colonialism don't you see this a form of mental slavery when 20% of the population are labelled untouchables and are mostly considered Asia's blacks? I recall my experience with an Indian friend in College who felt deeply offended that Sir Vivian Richards had a child with an Indian actress and the child was black. I felt amazed that he did not even try to hide his abhorrence of the black shade. I then watch the Indian movies and see the trend of worship for anything close to the white shade. Thinking of it don't we in the Caribbean also do similar things (Good hair, pretty color etc.) ?

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clarification

#19 PFKAR » 2011-03-02 05:49

Thanks for clearing that up, Tenman. The fact that there is a Willie Lynch buried in Antigua in no way validates the letter; I'm certain there are Willie Lynches buried all over the world. Let's assume that the Willie Lynch buried in Antigua can be shown through historical records to be a brutal slave holder from the continental colonies. That still does not validate the letter. I am merely pointing out that, due to analysis by historians turning up anachronisms and other inconsistencies, and the lack of proof of authorship, there is sufficient reason to doubt the authenticity of the letter. Keep in mind that the author's stance is no weaker if the letter is a hoax. I am simply suggesting that it is better to develop an argument on the honest treatment of fact, as opposed to fabrications used for effect. All sorts of bad ideas throughout history have been defended and developed into popular movements based on nonsense. That being said, I can not prove that the letter is a fraud.
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@ Tenman

#18 Morris » 2011-03-02 05:49

I think you might find the following link very interesting: http://www.manuampim.com/lynch_hoax1.html
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Morris

Legal Advice for the Scarlet Pimpernel

#17 Professor » 2011-03-02 05:47

A public accusation of plagarism by a blogger can give rise to a law suit in defamation (Libel).

A hosting site can be forced to provide the IP address of a blogger who injured the reputation of another and from there an exact location of the computer from which the defamatory statement was made can be ascertained. The computer can be seized as evidence and the owner held responsible. The rest is jurisprudence.
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Professor

@ professor

#16 my way of helping » 2011-03-02 05:42

I must say i agree with you on what is plagiarism.
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my way of helping

@Devil's Left Hand,

#15 tenman` » 2011-03-02 05:20

Devil's Left Hand, PFKAR stated that the evidence he/she has seen show that Willie Lynch is an urban legend. It was I who provided the references which dispute that and point to him being buried in Antigua

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tenman`

@ Antiguan Abroad ... PUT UP or SHUT UP ... show me the proof

#14 Professor » 2011-03-02 05:17

I will get past your ridiculous assertion that HEADING can be plagarized and advise you that the legal- academic threshold for "UNFAIR LIFTING" is only met if ANY SECTION of the work is duplicated VERBATIM (go to WESTLAW, LEXIS, LAW JOURNALS etc.). Let me save you some time, the law states that paraphrasing is ACCEPTABLE that is why the lifting has to be VERBATIM.

The requirement to receive a PhD in the social sciences is basically to create a restatement of concepts written about by peers. Scholars generally write about the same topic and the same concepts are routinely evoked, but plagarism ONLY occurs where sections are lifted VERBATIM.

As requested, I have reread both articles and have not found a single VERBATIM sentence or PHRASE that would meet the legal-academic threshold of failing to attribute sources.
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Professor

@ PFKAR the effects of the "miseducation of the negro" is why do you seem to have missed the point

#13 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 04:55

You provided proof that Willie Lynch is an actual white slave owner who was buried in Antigua, but yet you refer to him as an "urban legend" to prove that he did not actually say the words widely attributed to him in the article. You stated that the article's "sentiments were doubtless authentic throughout the 17th and 18th century" so why do you have a problem attributing them to this particular white slave owner?

The article correctly states that Blacks were actually broken like horses to become slaves;
Mental slavery exist today, as a result of a brainwashing process used during slavery;
Blacks were deliberately crossbred to produce the skin color problems that you see everyday;
Blacks were oppressed relative to the shade of their skin long after slavery (the banks in Antigua 1960's & early 1970s);
In every country in the world, Blacks as a whole are at the bottom to give credibility to white supremacy today.
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The Devil's Left Hand

@tenman

#12 oversee » 2011-03-02 04:50

There is a record of a William Lynch who was buried in August 1734 at the Valley (Valley Church?). I could not be certain this is the same person being discussed as there were other William Lynches of very roughly the same period residing in Antigua. There is however, for sure, an estate called Lynch's in St Phillips parish, St Phillips north to be exact. I first learned of it through my curiosity while looking at the area from a southwesterly direction and was told it was called Black Lynch: make of it what you will.
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oversee

#11 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 04:34

Professor, Did you read the two articles? If you did, I am nonplussed as to how you could credibly state that you failed to see long passages (and even captions) of the original text that were quoted VERBATIM (your words) by Mr. Pimpernel. Aside from that, if you are a university professor as you claim, your standards for plagiarism seem surprisingly lax. The legal definition for plagiarism, by the way, does not require the exact duplication of another's work....rather, the unfair use and lifting of a substantial portion of that work may constitute not only plagiarism, but copyright infringement as well. I suggest that you re-read both articles again, because if you would really allow your "graduate" students to hand in work like this and pass it off as their own, I'd certainly advise anyone against attending your cl** or school. By the way, the Willie Lynch speech itself is not the issue....it is the remainder of the article that is substantially plagiarized, in my opinion.
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Antiguan Abroad

@ Antiguan Abroad

#10 The Devil's Left Hand » 2011-03-02 04:24

The professor is 100% correct. Antiguan Abroad I do not want to disturb a "highly educated professional working with peers of every color, creed amd background". But I challenge you to show one paragraph, sentence or prhase of the article that in academin terms, has been "unatributed". I do believe that failing to do so you should feel sufficient professional courtesy to post an apology to the writer.

If you were in your right mind you would realize that beyond the quote from Willie Lynch 's Speech, the writers mentions the work of Frederick and shows that he is applying his own interpretation to a few of the concepts described in the book "Lets Make a Slave".

Look at how verociously you (a "black" person) attacked the black writer for having the courage to tell the ugly truth. It was the same way during slavery, there were always black people like you who would always defend their masters.
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The Devil's Left Hand

@ Antigua Abroad, Tenman & Morris

#9 Professor » 2011-03-02 03:22

I notice that the writer has been accused of failing to cite his authority, something I seldom see in any of the writings on this site. I agree that the concepts raised in this article are simmilar to the ones raised by Farrakhan, but I would not go as far as to cast spurious aspersions.

As an academic (graduate school professor), I want to inform you that the legal-academic standard employed to determine if a piece of work has been "plagarised" involves (1) whether the writer used the words from another work VERBATIM, which is not the case here for any part of the article. The Willie Lynch Speech is properly cited in quotation marks.

I deal with this issue on a daily basis and can tell you authoratatively that a writer is only required to cite sources for words used from a source VERBATIM. Different great writers have and will always revise earlier writing and give it their own treatment, but I suspect that the exact tendedencies described in the article are at work here among the critics.
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@ Antiguan Abroad

#8 Morris » 2011-03-02 02:38

I absolutely agree with you.
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@PFKAR

#7 tenman » 2011-03-02 02:33

PFKAR I have heard Alister Thomas suggest that Mr. Linch was from Antigua. There is a book "Willie Lynch Real or Imaginary" by Rahim Muhammad (you can google it) which provides evidence that Thomas is correct by providing burial records which show him as being buried here Aug 1734.


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tenman

#6 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 01:42

Tenman, I don't believe that the tendency for large numbers of people to blindly (or willingly) follow corrupt, authoritarian governments is peculiar to Antigua...or black people in general. Look at China and India with the world's largest populations. Some would question whether these governments always look out for the best interests of the majority of their citizens.....does this mean that Indians and Chinese are also universally victim to this "mental slavery"? Who knows....maybe, maybe not. But I reject the proposition that blacks around "the globe" are the sole victims of this human condition.
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Antiguan Abroad

Willie Lynch?

#5 PFKAR » 2011-03-02 01:36

SP,

You may want to do a little research on the Willie Lynch letter. From what I've seen, the letter is a hoax which first showed up in the early 1970s, filled with anachronisms which preclude its claimed 1717 authorship.

http://web.archive.org/web/20070814182601/http://www.jelanicobb.com/portfolio/willie_lynch_is_dead.html

Of course, this does nothing to undercut the fact that these sentiments were doubtless authentic throughout the 17th and 18th century. I'd simply offer that any valid points to be found in your argument will stand on their own merit, without having to elicit help from propaganda and urban legends.
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@Antiguan Abroad

#4 tenman » 2011-03-02 01:11

Antiguan Abroad I do agree with you that to say that all black persons are trapped in mental slavery would be wrong, however when focusing on Antigua would you disagree that one of the major things that keep us from moving forward is mental slavery? This is not to say that everyone here is constrained by mental slavery but too many. As far as the originality of the article, I agree with you that the writer, because of the closeness to the Farrakhan article, should have sited it as a reference.

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tenman

#3 Fed Up » 2011-03-02 00:29

interesting article, although I have one observation. If what you assert is true, that the desendants of black african slaves are so messed up because of the white slave masters methods, then how come black people in africa, who were never slaves to the white man, only their own 'tribal masters, are also messed up in the same way ?
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Fed Up

Pt. 2

#2 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 00:04

But even more egregious than this writer making these spurious and un-supported claims, is the fact that most of his so-called "article" appears to have been plagiarized from an article written more than a century ago and re-printed in "The Final Call", a newspaper publication of Minister Louis Farrakhan. This type of plagiarism is the cardinal sin for anyone claiming to be an academic.......and even for an undergraduate freshman, it would almost certainly result in expulsion and ridicule. The following link is from the article published in Louis Farrakhan's paper almost two years ago. Note the almost exact replication by the Scarlet Pimpernel of the points in the earlier article, and draw your own conclusions:

http://www.finalcall.com/artman/publish/Perspectives_1/Willie_Lynch_letter_The_Making_of_a_Slave.shtml
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Antiguan Abroad

Pt. 1

#1 Antiguan Abroad » 2011-03-02 00:03

I hate to have to say this...but this writer has lost all credibility. And I especially regret what I am about to say because he had written several earlier pieces that I had found to be quite compelling. However, he has now posited an opinion piece that "black people in every corner of the globe are entrapped in a mindset which keeps them enslaved today as they were 300 years ago". ABOSOLUTE RUBBISH! Aside from being over-broad and extraordinarily generalized, the statement would have you believe that there has been no progress by blacks for the last 300 years. Does President Obama have this mindset the author speaks of? Does Nelson Mandela? Does Oprah Winfrey? Do I, as highly educated professional working with peers of every color, creed and background? I think not.
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The Scarlet Pimpernel

The Scarlet Pimpernel is the nom de plume of an Antiguan born “knowledge broker” whose intercontinental exploits involve work as a university founder and educator, military strategist, international legal consultant, United States prosecutor, published author, trade advisor in Latin America and international investment counselor.

The inimitable acuity of the “Pimpernel” is sought after by entrepreneurs, investors and governments from Dubai to Brazil. Recent work, created for Latin America, which speaks to the conjunction of technology and education to reduce cost, motivate students and improve testing results will be translated and introduced to school systems across the Caribbean later this year. “Employing anonymity to domesticate the ego ...”

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