WRONG_WOEID WRONG_WOEID

PM, Gaston Share Hug

PM Spencer at the opening session of the CARICOM Inter-Faith ConferenceAntigua St. John's - In a rare display of public affection, PM Baldwin Spencer and Opposition Leader Gaston Browne shared a hug during the opening session of the CARICOM Inter-Faith Conference on Monday.


Scores of regional political and religious leaders converged at the Jolly Beach Resort for the inaugural event.


The meeting aims to foster a greater relationship between the regional states and the religious groups, in a bid to rid the nations of growing ills.


Before the feature address was delivered by PM Spencer, Rev Cortwright Jarvis called on the two political leaders to embrace each other.



Without hesitation, the two men laughed, shook hands, and shared a hug, to the delight of a cheering audience.




Shortly afterwards, PM Spencer began his brief remarks by saying, "Behold how good and how pleasant it is for us to dwell together in unity… I also boldly declare that the Almighty is my shield and my buckler … Although grounded in the Christian faith, I do not prejudice the other faiths.”



He added, "We need the inter-faith organisations to partner with the governments to surmount the challenges that we face. All the killing and larceny cannot be accepted. Criminals must be  caught and prosecuted. We must not be held in bondage. Along with the faith-based groups, we can accomplish much "


Spencer said that collectively, the religious bodies can bring about change in deviant behaviour. He said they have a duty to care, and should assist in finding solutions to the ills plaguing society.


He lauded the CARICOM Secretariat, Dr Clarence Henry, and Apostle Stephen Andrew for organising the conference, which is expected to be an annual event.


Among the religious groups represented were Christians, Rastafarians, Muslims, and Ethiopian Orthodox.


The second installment is planned for St Vincent and the Grenadines next year.
 
 



Reporting by Caribarena news, publishing by Ofer Shaked.

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18 Comments In This Article   

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@SlyThatGuy & thebanned-one

#18 Observer... » 2014-02-19 23:57

Last Sunday’s mass the homily of the priest was about his trip to a village in Kenia. He stayed at a family in a village where there is not electricity and no running water. And yet he explained how everyone was happy. He said he had never seen so happy people. And they shared everything with one another. The houses were made of mud walls. We would surely die in such an environment. The word happy would be something we perhaps have heard of but we sure would not have smiles on our face. That is the reality we live in. They surely won’t have the same kind of crime like we have here. But this goes to tell you that everything is really irrelevant. We grew up being happy children and we raise children and wonder how we can made them happy. Buying them all the toys and gadgets we can buy, yet many of them are not happy. We need to have a revival of our moral values. And the church need to play their role in that.
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Observer...

@ thebanned-one

#17 SlyThatGuy » 2014-02-19 11:59

This is a very interesting question because some people are really under the impression that the cost of living was better back then in the early 1960s and 1970s but it was not. Yes, thing were cheap, but the money was hard to come by. The salary of a mother and father combined was not enough money to provide for their family's basic needs (children wore hand-me -down clothes and shoes). My father, let me inform you, would have never been able to extend his hand to a member of his family to lend a $50. Many families were suffering from poverty but did not know they were poor. They were just so contented. And I guess the reason they were in this state of peaceful happiness was because everybody was on the same level and crime was almost non existent. I would't necessarily say stuff like eggs and limes were easy to come by but people did improvised a lot: They raised pigs for meat and chickens for eggs, cultivated vegetable gardens and fruit trees for food, and they purchased fabric to make their own clothes. Today, things are better. Families earn more money and can afford to provide for their family basic needs. The difference is we did not have a lot of the things that people are competing against each other for. For example, people weren't try so hard to get computers, televisions, cell phone, houses, big SUV,etc.
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SlyThatGuy

@ Observer

#16 SlyThatGuy » 2014-02-18 21:35

I can relate to what you're saying. Those were the good old days when neighbors were truly neighbors. There was a tremendous amount of brotherly and neighborly love--people sharing with each other, visiting each other, and watching out for each other's children in their absence. I which those days had continued till now. Today you don't even know the name of the person living next door to you. I guess you're right, we lack consideration for one another because we became chiefly concerned about out own profit.
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SlyThatGuy

Really???

#15 jj » 2014-02-18 21:29

People are getting robbed, beaten, chopped, raped, molested, murdered and God only knows what else in Antigua. Do you seriously think that anyone cares about politicians hugging?

I would rather see a picture of one of them empathetically embracing one of the many victims in Antigua's crime wave. All we do is read about the victimization, but never anything about visits and help from politicians, let alone what they are going to do to make Antigua a safer place.
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jj

RE: PM, Gaston Share Hug

#14 Thong in Cheek » 2014-02-18 20:58

Is this truly a photo of the PM or someone copied one of Nelson Mandella in error?
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Thong in Cheek

interesting discussion

#13 thebanned-one » 2014-02-18 18:02

Observer and Sly.. do you think poverty now is the same as poverty back then? Observer, as you stated back then there was more of a community. Recall it being easy (free) to get things like eggs and lime back then. Would not say it was crime free then but would agree the level of violence now is more. Part of it, I agree, lies with the list Sly gave but lets also admit there was not easy access to the kinds of destructive weapons which are available now. The police back then also seemed more present. Back then (lets say the late 70's early 80's) if you decided to go bike riding with no lights, chances are you would be stopped. Lets also admit that parents back then were not working shifts as they are now. Lets also admit that these days more than back then persons are almost forced to work more than one job, in order to survive. Who minding the pickney them?
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thebanned-one

Members Of The Sanhedrim Meet Caesar & Breach The Wall of Separation!

#12 John French !! » 2014-02-18 17:43

Notes From A Native Son Of The RocK! Discourse at The Amofah Market at Da Bridge is Hot Today! The Akans are beyond themselves. Woe be Unto Sadducees & Pharisees they Say. Elders await the Ides of March to exact Taxes, akin to Julius Caesar's fateful day, on the Sadducees & Pharisees scheming game, born of the Bridge, ... a plan to assemble a band of Spades who would head the other way to rob the hamlet dwellers' fortunes in the countryside: a selection of [u]Clubs with dazzling masquerading skills & truly heartless masks were needed to complete this task & cruel mission. ... the most notorious Aces, who could abandon their musical bands for a short time. Edgar O. Lake - THE DEVIL'S BRIDGE.It has been said that Thomas Jefferson was a US President of Deep Religious Conviction & a Staunch Believer of Separation of Church & State. He wrote the "Empire of Liberty" as America's role to Spread Freedom around the World. In his Will he only freed 5 of some 200 Enslaved Africans.
Henry VIII founded his own Religious Order The Church of England (Anglican) & had 8 wives.
Confidants say that the Good Hon. Dr. PM wants to be remembered as the Most Caring Leader in The Caribbean.Quote:
The other Dons in the room applauded & rose to shake hands & to congratulate Don Corleone & Don Tattaglia on their new friendship...
Seen this ACT before:Manley/Seaga. Oh Gad! Pray Fuh Mi Picknees!
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John French !!

@SlyThatGuy » 2014-02-18 15:34

#11 Observer... » 2014-02-18 16:38

For the first time I find myself to agreeing with you. Only because you didn't put no political spin to it. There was poverty then yet the crime rate was low. For me one of the reasons is we have become selfish. Every men/women for himself. I live in a neighborhood and when my trees are bearing fruits I share with my neighbors. Whether they ask me or not. And I can tell you this is not reciprocal. I like mangoes, and one of my neighbour has two mango trees. But when the tree bears I have to literally beg him for a mango. In the old days growing up we were very much dependent on one another. My mother would sometimes sent us to the neighbour to borrow some sugar. And nothing was wrong with that. Only my father must not know. Because that would make him very mad. That was a big ego thing for him. And the police knew everyone and everyone knew the police. So if someone committed a crime, not before long the police will know who to pick up. These days no one talk and nothing gets solved. These are the things we need to change. I wonder if we can. You cannot even speak to someone else’s child.
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Observer...

RE: PM, Gaston Share Hug

#10 SlyThatGuy » 2014-02-18 15:34

I was born and raised in Antigua and Barbuda. As a teenager, I also lived in four (4) other Caribbean countries for a short period. Every one of the different islands I lived on during those years had a very high poverty rate and poor government service, but they hardly had any crime.Today, the poverty rate and the government services in these same islands--including Antigua and Barbuda--remain the same, but crime is everywhere. Why? What changed? I attribute it to the introduction of illegal drugs through drug smuggling in the region, the easy access to guns, and the ability to link through the establishment of gangs. We have to get rid of those if we hope to see a significant decrease in crime.
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SlyThatGuy

Dangerous man #2

#9 Observer... » 2014-02-18 12:08

And yet parishioners and other faithful worshippers will go to church on Sunday and pretend nothing has happened. You see Baldwin feels the writing is on the wall and is pulling all stops. And he knows the only way to win is to again muscle the churches to put him over the finish line. I wonder if Bishop Reese will once again appear on his stage to bless him and call up on all the Catholic Faithfull followers to do what the Bishop tells them to do. Cause if it’s one religion that blindly follows their bishops and other leaders is the Catholics. They don’t easily rebel against their leaders. And especially the single middle age women. To me they are under full control of the Bishop. He is their savior and redeemer and their way to God almighty. Whatever bishop says is the gospel for sure.
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Observer...

Dangerous man #1

#8 Observer.. » 2014-02-18 12:07

Calibri (Body)
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Observer..

Antiguan Unity

#7 Mr. Byam » 2014-02-18 10:38

This a great example set by the LOO, and hopefully this is a harbenger of things to come.

Marco Polo,
Three cheers and amen to that.
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Mr. Byam

And We Care Because....

#6 Marco Polo » 2014-02-18 10:10

The absence of some modicum of civility in politics results in.... Jamaica-style garrison politics. That's why I care. Rise against....
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Marco Polo

machiavellian leader

#5 thebanned-one » 2014-02-18 09:40

Quote:
“There is nothing more important than appearing to be religious.” ― Niccolò Machiavelli
The same PM has likened his supporters to crusaders on a mission to sell the UPP religion. He has stated that they should do this even when in church. Using such rhetoric, as he does, only promotes violence and division since he labels the other side as being evil
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thebanned-one

@ Wisdom

#4 Jimmy » 2014-02-18 08:05

Another axiom to remember: "God may put on pajamas, but he never sleeps!"
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Jimmy

@Aaas

#3 Duncy Bat » 2014-02-18 08:02

We care because while people are busy getting riled up about politicians cursing left right and centre deep down they are all chums.
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Duncy Bat

RE: PM, Gaston Share Hug

#2 Aaas » 2014-02-18 06:02

And we care because????????
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Aaas

Be not deceived, God is not mocked

#1 Wisdom » 2014-02-18 05:58

While I have every regard for harmonious working relationship between the church and state, it is too obvious that this is just a gimmick aimed at suring up failed sitting governments. Just look at the rotation to get my point, the selection of the guest speaker (for an inter-faith meeting), the persons organizing it and even the role of known UPP advocate and defender, Rev. Jarvis.
Be not deceived, God is not mocked..........anyb ody who ever player Warri with God ended up with NO SEED. Now more than ever, time for UPP to go.
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Wisdom

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